Human Development Fellows: 2014-16

The Human Development Fellowship program aims to help a select group of Dartmouth’s top students develop the technical skills and professional experiences necessary to work in international development. The following students were awarded fellowships for the 2014-16 and 2015-17 academic years.

2014-16 Fellows

KRIPA DONGOL

A graduate of United World Colleges and the National Outdoor Leadership School, Kripa Dongol hails from Nepal and earned a degree in Geography. At Dartmouth, she worked in diverse settings: as a HOP Garage intern at the budding BarHop (an effort to diversify the social scene at the College) and as an Undergraduate Advisor for the Native American House. On campus, she served on the board of Milan (the South Asian Student Association), played rugby, and was a member of Sigma Delta sorority. As co-chair of philanthropy for the Dartmouth Women's Rugby Club, she organized the 6th Annual Cully's Run. She served as a Tucker Service Fellow teaching in a Nepali primary school, was a farm intern with the Office of Sustainability, and worked with Dartmouth Roots to collaborate on plans to bridge the gap between ideas and implementation for ways to improve Dartmouth. Kripa worked with Professor Sienna Craig, who is focused on global health and development and conducts research in Nepal, as her mentor. As a Human Development Fellow, Kripa undertook an internship at One HEART Worldwide in Nepal. One HEART is a non-profit organization dedicated to reducing preventable deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth in remote, rural, and indigenous communities. Upon graduation, Kripa was awarded a Lombard Public Service Fellowship to teach environmental science and leadership skills at the Maya Academy in rural Nepal. 

Personal Statement

My professional goal is to work in the field of human Development. I am excited to with communities to redefine the idea of ‘development’ and then to collaborate with them on planning a process to meet those desired outcomes. I am passionate about social equity, education, and public health.

Faculty Mentor

Professor Sienna Craig, Anthropology

ANNELISE SAUTER

Annelise Sauter was born and raised in Costa Rica. At Dartmouth, she pursued an Economics major modified with Environmental Studies and a German Studies minor. To compare experiences living in developed and developing countries, she actively sought out off-campus opportunities through the German LSA and FSP in Berlin and the Environmental Studies FSP in southern Africa. Upon graduation, Annelise was hired to work for Dartmouth's Sustainability Office.  

Personal Statement

I am driven by efficiency but our current system is not making efficient use of its resources. With the skills that I learned through the Human Development Fellowship, I am more prepared to engage in the complicated conversation about how we can use resources more efficiently to promote human development. 

Faculty Mentor

Professor Taryn Dinkelman, Economics

KATIE TRINH

Katie Trinh is from northern California’s Bay Area. At Dartmouth, she majored in economics, with a focus on development and finance courses. As a Junior, she studied international trade and the economics of industry at Oxford. Katie also took classes in the Government Department – particularly ones related to weapons and war. Outside of classes, Katie was co-chair for ESL Tutoring, a research assistant for the Economics Department, and a sister of Kappa Delta Epsilon sorority. She also served as a Tucker Foundation Intern, a Tucker Leader in Community, and a Dickey Center Great Issues Scholar. Upon graduation, Katie was hired by Oliver Wyman, a leading global management consulting firm.

Personal Statement

I am particularly interested in Human Development from the perspective of development economics. I view the field as a way to tie together my academic pursuits and my interest in service and social justice. Specific topics that I feel passionate about are discrepancies in standard of living, their relation to child labor and educational attainment, and whether government policies are making a difference. Through this fellowship, I was able to explore development economics more deeply, enhance my analytical skills in research, and advance my career and life goals.

Faculty Mentor

Professor Eric Edmonds, Economics

 

 

2015-17 Fellows

Skye Herrick

Skye Herrick is from upstate New York and is pursuing a major in Economics modified with Geography, as well as dabbling in Computer Science. Before attending Dartmouth, she took a gap year to work as an au pair in France and then volunteered with primary schools in Tanzania. Skye received a Tucker Fellowship to spend her first-year summer working with a Christian development organization in Malawi.  As a Human Development Fellow, Skye undertook an internship at The Clothing Bank in East London, South Africa. Skye also spent a term in southern Africa with the Environmental Studies FSP. At Dartmouth she is heavily involved in the Christian community, including singing in X.ado, Dartmouth’s Christian a cappella group. She has also worked as an Undergraduate Advisor.  

Personal Statement

Skye is excited to explore the field of development economics and is confident the Human Development Fellowship will help her find ways to apply her quantitative brain to qualitative problems. Specifically, she hopes to work on finding evidence-based solutions in fields such as education, and plans on an international career.

Faculty Mentor

Paul Novosad, Economics

Ashley Manning

Ashley Manning was born and raised in Lima, Peru. She is a Geography major focusing on human development and culture, with a potential minor in Government or Latin American studies. At Dartmouth, Ashley has worked as an undergraduate advisor at the Global Village and as a Spanish drill instructor. She is also a member of Alpha Xi Delta sorority, Community Service Coordinator of the College Hillel, and a War & Peace Fellow. Ashley was also a Paganucci Fellow, working with students at the Tuck School of Business as part of a development consulting team.

Personal Statement

Human development has been an important theme in Ashley's life prior to matriculation at Dartmouth, and she hopes to continue to pursue it after graduation. “This fellowship directly correlates to many of my personal and professional goals – it’s a unique opportunity to broaden my perspectives on what development really is.”

Faculty Mentor

Susanne Freidberg, Geography

Alisa White

Alisa White hails from Albany, NY, and is an Economics and Environmental Studies major. Alisa has worked for the Dartmouth Sustainability Office as an Eco Rep and as the treasurer of the Sustainable Living Center. She was a Great Issues Scholar at the Dickey Center and also participated in the Rockefeller Center's Peer Mentoring Program. Alisa also participated in the Environmental Studies Africa FSP. She sings with the Dodecaphonics, a co-ed acapella group, and is president of Dartmouth Rootstrikers, an activist group for campaign finance reform.

Personal Statement

Under the broad heading of human development, Alisa is most interested in human decision-making. Specifically, she seeks to understand how incentives, public policy, scarce resources and environmental pressures influence household decision-making in developing countries. “Through this Fellowship, I hope to not only gain further research skills but also develop a more personal understanding of the difficulty of decision-making in the face of many types of scarcity. Overall, I am excited for this opportunity to tie together academics and my recent field experience in Ecuador with my upcoming research with Professor Zinman.”

Faculty Mentor

Jonathan Zinman, Economics

Kripa Dongol
Annelise Sauter
Katie Trinh

The 2014-16 Fellows (from top): Kripa Dongol, Annelise Sauter, and Katie Trinh

Skye Herrick
Ashley Manning
Alisa White

The 2015-17 Fellows (from top): Skye Herrick, Ashley Manning, and Alisa White

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