Video

Friday, August 8, 2014 - 12:08pm
Christine Urbanowicz

Christine Urbanowicz, Ph.D. Student, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Christine Urbanowicz studies the pollinators and plant-pollinator interactions that are beneficial for flowing plants in Greenland’s tundra ecosystem. She is interested in how variation in plant density and temperature influence the number of pollinators that visit flowers and the number of fruits a plant produces. She is also collecting data on parasites of bumblebees in Greenland.

In 2013, Christine counted the numbers of insects visiting flowers in six sites around Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, that were... Read more.

Friday, August 8, 2014 - 12:05pm
Jessica Trout-Haney

Jessica Trout-Haney, Ph.D. Student, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Jess Trout-Haney studies how climate change affects high latitude aquatic ecosystems, specifically their physical, biochemical, and biological properties. She studies how differences in lake chemistry and morphometry of low-nutrient Arctic lakes affect the abundance of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins in southwestern Greenland.

In the summer of 2013, Jess surveyed 19 lakes of varying size and depth between Kangerlussuaq and the Greenland Ice Sheet in southwestern Greenland. She ran sonar transects across each... Read more.

Friday, August 8, 2014 - 9:43am
Ruth Heindel

Ruth Heindel, Ph.D. Student, Earth Sciences

Ruth Heindel studies soils, a valuable resource for Greenland that supports natural ecosystems and also agricultural activity in South Greenland. Specifically, she studies past and present wind-driven soil erosion, a process that threatens soil resources by removing soil and disturbing vegetation.

During the summers of 2012 and 2013, Ruth collected spatial data describing eroded areas in the Kangerlussuaq region. Additionally, she measured lichen diameters in order to estimate past and present rates of soil erosion. In the spatial... Read more.

Friday, August 8, 2014 - 8:06am
Lauren Culler

Lauren Culler, Ph.D., Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Dickey Center Arctic Fellow and Outreach Coordinator

Climate change is causing temperatures to rise in the Arctic and Lauren is studying how these changes in temperature affect mosquito emergence from freshwater ponds.

During the summers of 2011 and 2012, Lauren Culler counted the number of mosquitoes in several ponds near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, every few days and measured how many mosquitoes emerged from each pond. (See picture of individually wrapper mosquitoes.) She also used lab studies at Kangerlussuaq... Read more.

Thursday, August 7, 2014 - 4:47pm
Julia Bradley-Cook

Julia Bradley-Cook, Ph.D. Student, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Julia Bradley-Cook is studying how climate warming is altering the biological processes that control carbon flow through natural ecosystems. She investigates microbial decomposition in tundra soils where permafrost and cold soil temperatures have allowed for the buildup of large stores of carbon.

In 2011 and 2012, Julia collected samples from soil pits to measure soil carbon content across two spatial scales:  the local area near Kangerlussuaq and the regional area of western Greenland (Kangerlussuaq,... Read more.

Monday, May 19, 2014 - 12:47pm
Sam Streeter at Denali

by Sam Streeter '13, TH '14

Watch Sam's video about his work. 

During the spring-summer 2013 interim and continuing through the summer 2013 term, I performed research in the Dartmouth College Earth Sciences (EARS) Department as an engineering senior honors thesis student, Stefansson Research Fellow, and John Lindsley Fund grant recipient. The first portion of my experience involved fieldwork on the Kahiltna Glacier in the Alaska Range in Denali National Park, Alaska, and the second portion was laboratory-based in the Dartmouth EARS Department.

My research experience... Read more.

Saturday, November 9, 2013 - 10:01am
Ehud Olmert

View Prime Minister Ehud Olmert's presentation on November 12, 2013, online.

Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, who many say came as close as any politician to a peace agreement with the Palestinians, welcomed the opportunity to outline his thoughts on the prospects for peace amid the Arab Spring in a November 12 address at Dartmouth, “where so many heads of state and world leaders have visited before me.”

Daniel Benjamin, Director of the Dickey Center for International Understanding, noted that Olmert is an important figure in Israeli and Mideast... Read more.

Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - 3:19pm

The IGERT Polar Environmental Change PhD Program at the Institute of Arctic Studies sends a number of young women into the field to do polar science and engineering. In fact a majority of the 24 IGERT fellows are women. 

After a recent field season in Greenland, they wanted to show their enthusiasm for science and field work by creating a video. Read about some of the reasons they created it and watch it for yourself on YouTube.

 

Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 8:23am

Dartmouth Now features a story about Emily Unger '11 who completed a whirlwind, worldwide trip to interview students on Dartmouth-sponsored international internships. She tells her story in the Nov/Dec issue of the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine. Her trip was sponsored by the Dickey Center. “We want to capture the unique ‘learning-while-doing’ experiences students have in the field,” explains Dickey Acting Director Christianne Wohlforth. “And we want to turn the telling of those stories into a professional development opportunity in itself.”

The Dickey Center has just celebrated its... Read more.

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