Environment

Student is Arctic Council Delegate in Russia

A Week as an Arctic Council Delegate in Arkhangelsk, Russia (reprinted from ARCUS)

by Ali Giese, PhD Candidate, Earth Sciences

During the last week of February 2014, I had the privilege of representing the United States and Dartmouth College at the 2014 Model Arctic Council, a role-playing program with the same goals as the better-known Model UN: to expose students to high-level policy negotiations through experience and participation. The Model Arctic Council was held at the Northern Arctic Federal University (NArFU) in Arkhangelsk, Russia. Thirty graduate students from more than ten countries participated in simulated proceedings of the Arctic Council, a high-level intergovernmental forum for promoting cooperation, coordination, and interaction among the Arctic States, with the involvement of Arctic indigenous communities, on common Arctic issues.

Talking About Science (ARCUS)

Read the story in Dartmouth Now, October 28, 2013

Witness the Arctic, a publication of the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S., Oct 23, 2013

Lee McDavid, Arctic Program Manager, Dartmouth College, Dickey Center for International Understanding

A dozen teenagers from Greenland, Denmark, and the U.S. are twirling across the rolling tundra on the edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet laughing, looking as though they're just fooling around. But Dartmouth graduate students Julia Bradley-Cook and Ruth Heindel are leading them in a "carbon cycle dance" as a way to understand photosynthesis and other biological processes important to global warming.

IGERTs Win and Place for NSF Fellowship

Seventeen Dartmouth students and alumni have received prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships (GRF) for 2014. Recipients include IGERT Fellow Alden Adolph, who will continue her research at Thayer School of Engineering studying the physical properties of snow and firn. Honorable mentions included IGERT Ruth Heindel, an earth sciences PhD student working with Ross Virginia on geosciences and paleoclimate.

Adolph is among 2,000 winners drawn from an applicant pool of more than 14,000. An additional 19 Dartmouth applicants were accorded honorable mention in the competition.

Read the entire Dartmouth Now story by Joseph Blumberg.

Dartmouth Researchers Head South for the Winter -- to Antarctica

by Lee McDavid, Arctic Program Manager

A number of Dartmouth students, faculty and staff will be celebrating the holidays far from home, in fact, just about as far from home as you can get, unless you're a penguin.

Starting around Antarctica Day on December 1--which celebrates the signing of the international treaty in 1959 that preserves Antarctica as a place for research and peaceful purposes--and continuing well past Hanukkah, Christmas, New Years, and even Martin Luther King Day, Dartmouth researchers will be living and working "on the ice," the nickname for the most uninhabitable continent on earth. But the only continent with no permanent residents also has a lot of visitors, many of them researchers.

IGERT Nina Lany Presents at NOAC Conference

by Nina Lany, Dartmouth IGERT Fellow

Attending the 5th North American Ornithological Conference (NAOC) was a great experience, especially for a PhD student who does not specialize in bird research! Over 1,400 people from 25 countries came together in Vancouver, British Columbia from August 14-18, 2012, to present on all things bird related. I was impressed by the combination of excellent fundamental research in ecology and evolution and work that is truly able to inform conservation and policy.

Black-throated blue warbler nest containing 2-3 day old nestlings at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in NH. Photo: Charlie Governali

IGERT Students Experience "Big Science"

by Lee McDavid, Program Manager, Institute of Arctic Studies

Photos by Courtney Hammond '11

Five Dartmouth graduate students in engineering, earth sciences, and ecology are bundled into puffy parkas and insulated pants standing on a layer of ice a mile thick marveling at a panoramic 360-degree blanket of white. "It makes me feel so small. It's humbling," says earth sciences graduate student Lee Corbett. Tonight it will be near zero and she'll be sleeping in a tent.

Welcome to the Greenland Ice Sheet, the first leg of the annual Dartmouth IGERT field seminar for graduate students in the polar environmental change program.

Report Defines a New Framework to Improve the Health and Well-being of Arctic Communities

Rapidly changing health conditions in the Arctic, due in part to climate change and globalization, call for a dramatically new approach to research and delivery of services to improve the health and wellness in Arctic communities, according to a report released by the Dickey Center for International Understanding and the UArctic Institute for Applied Circumpolar Policy (IACP).

Communities from the Canadian North to the Russian Arctic face a variety of health challenges ranging from the movement north of insect and water borne diseases as temperatures rise, the threat of environmental contaminants such as mercury, an increase in heart disease and obesity with a shift away from traditional foods, as well as the difficulty of providing health services to remote areas.
Twenty-seven health experts met last year at Dartmouth to tackle the critical health issues facing Arctic communities and to recommend ways of combating these problems.  They conclude that a focus on wellness and the resilience of Northern communities is a more productive path to solutions than many traditional health care approaches.

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