Environment

Poisonous Snakes and Earthquakes: Conservation in Costa Rica

by Victoria Chi '17

During the spring of 2017, Alexander Cotnoir ’19 interned in Costa Rica at Osa Conservation, an organization that works to protect the biodiversity of Osa Peninsula.

When students engage in internships abroad, they often have to adapt to new and unexpected work environments. Few students, however, have to brave thunderstorms and earthquakes, poisonous snakes and insects, and toxic plants. Environmental Studies major Alexander Cotnoir ’19 confronted all of these obstacles, fearlessly and even with excitement, during his internship in the spring of 2017.

Dickey Center Fellow Receives Prestigious Research Award from the Government of Canada

We are extremely pleased to announce that Leah Sarson, postdoctoral research associate in the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth and Visiting Arctic Fellow in the Institute of Arctic Studies, was recently chosen to receive a prestigious Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) fellowship from the Government of Canada, an award given to the “most promising Canadian new scholars in the social sciences and humanities.”

Sarson will use her award to continue her postdoctoral work at Dartmouth with Melody Brown Burkins, Adjunct Professor of Environmental Studies and Associate Director for Programs and Research at the Dickey Center, Ross Virginia, Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science and Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies, and several other Dartmouth colleagues.

Virginia Comments on Greenland Toxins in Popular Science Article

July 12, 2017  |  Popular Science

As the huge ice sheet melts, it releases toxins—and microbes that eat them, reports Poular Science magazine. They turned for comment to Professor Ross Virginia, Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies: “It’s potentially good news that degraders are found in the melting ice ecosystem." 

Read the entire article in Popular Science, July 11, 2017.

Fulbright Arctic Initiative Accepting Applications

July 12, 2017  |  Fulbright Scholar Program release

Fulbright Arctic Initiative information (pdf)

18-month research program will expand collaborative networks and address shared priorities

The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs has announced the launch of the second Fulbright Arctic Initiative.

The Fulbright Arctic Initiative is designed to create a network to stimulate international research collaboration on Arctic issues while increasing mutual understanding between people of the United States and the people of other countries.  Using a collaborative multidisciplinary model to emphasize communication across disciplines and knowledge co-production, the Initiative will translate theory into practice to address public-policy research questions relevant to Arctic Council member states’ shared challenges and opportunities.

Science Diplomacy & MAC Workshop Agenda

Download Program Agenda (pdf)

Download Program Participants List (pdf)

Sunday, June 25

Dress: casual

12:00-6:00pm 
Arrival/Check In & Registration Packet Pick Up, Fahey Hall

Monday, June 26:  Arctic Science Diplomacy

Dress: casual (outdoor activity)

Ross Virginia Reflects on His 27-Year Antarctic Research Project

April 20, 2017  |  Dartmouth News  |  Bill Platt

Just back from his final trip to Antarctica as an investigator for the Long Term Ecological Research Program, Professor Ross Virginia breaks off a conversation and strides across his office to pull out a hundred-year-old volume of Robert Falcon Scott’s The Voyage of the Discovery.

“This is his first expedition. It’s just a treasure,” says Virginia, the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science.

“I’m just amazed and fascinated by all of this,” he says as he thumbs through the collected journals of the British explorer who, in 1912, was the second man to reach the South Pole (achieving the feat just 34 days behind Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen).

The Creeping, Quiet Gaslighting of the EPA

March 9, 2017  |  Wired

In a Wired magazine article about attempts by the Trump Administration to lessen the effectivenss of the Environmental Protection Agency, Melody Brown Burkins (A&S '98, PhD), Associate Director for Research and Programs at the Dickey Center, questions the purpose of legislation introduced by Representative Lamar Smith, a Texas Republican and climate skeptic.

“[The act] is effectively saying that the practice of peer review, the gold standard of how science moves to policymakers, is secretive and can’t be trusted.”

Dr. Burkins is an adjunct professor of environmental studies and science policy at Dartmouth and chair of the US National Committee for the Geological Sciences, and a member of the National Academies' Board on International Scientific Organizations (BISO).

Next of Kin: Seeing Extinction Through the Artist's Lens

May 2, 2017 |  Dartmouth Press Release  

Exhibition by Christina Seely with the Canary Project at the Harvard Museum of Natural History Through July 16, 2017.

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