Health

Reflections on Living and Working in Rwanda

by Kelly Everhart MS, MIV, Geisel School of Medicine 

Rwandan Ministry of Health

We landed in Kigali around 10 pm, 30 hours after leaving Boston Logan. The first thing I noticed about Rwanda’s capital city were the lights — on approach to the airport, instead of the haphazard array of neon and LED lights I associate with US or European cities, we flew over thousands of yellow sodium and low-wattage fluorescent street lights. Few, very few, lights fell outside of the linear arrangement lining (some of) Kigali’s streets — I later learned that the homes which do have access to electricity conserve it tightly, since electricity is an expensive commodity here.

The second thing I noticed blew in through the aircraft’s open doors once we were parked on the tarmac — smoke, the smell of a whole city’s cooking fires. But, coupled with the many military and policemen carrying semi-automatics patrolling the airport and the history of the 1994 Genocide I had finished on the plane, the smoke elicited apprehensive thoughts in my mind, so incongruent with the friendly hospitality I now associate with the same smell.

Little Devices Lab Creates Tech to Improve Global Healthcare

by Kaira Lujan '16, Little Devices Lab, MIT

Winter term 2015 I was working at Little Devices Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The lab is a part of the International Design Center, a collaboration between the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) and MIT. The main focus of the lab is to create accessible healthcare tech to improve global healthcare. One of the ways the lab does this is by solving problems using innovative ways to hack existing resources. Some examples of what they have done in the past include creating a solar autoclave (the solarclave) for sterilization in locations off the grid, and designing a foot pump nebulizer for medicine administration (in areas without consistent utility connections).

Improving Water, Improving Health in Ecuador

by Alex Lopez '15

In Winter 2015, Doug Phipps ’17 spent eight weeks teaching health education at primary and secondary schools in Muisne, Ecuador. Apart from teaching, Doug worked with the organization Water Ecuador to design and carry out a survey on water consumption and perception. Situated on the island of Muisne, Doug had the unique opportunity to immerse himself in a completely new environment and community with the Water Ecuador team, while building upon his existing Spanish language skills and making new friends with the members of his host organization and local community.

"Living in a rural Ecuadorean town without English speaking companions not only made me improve my Spanish,” says Doug, “it enabled me to hear locals' stories and to learn more about myself." 

Water Ecuador aims to improve health in Ecuador through research, water purification kiosks, and education. The organization runs water purification centers in three towns on the coast of Ecuador, where the locals that run the Center purify water, fill 20-liter jugs, and sell them for one dollar.

Global Health Case Competition Engaged Contrasting Viewpoints

Six Dartmouth students were selected to compete at the International Emory Global Health Case Competition in Atlanta, GA, in 2015. These are their reflections on the competition and on their experience working with diverse opinions to come up with solutions to difficult problems.

by Cecelia Shao '16

Since each of us was chosen individually, before our first team meeting, we didn’t know who we were going to be competing alongside. It turned out to be an incredibly diverse team of six including two undergrads (Anna and myself), a MD/PhD candidate (Christiaan R.) two Geisel students (Vanessa S. and Tolu K.), as well as a Tuck student (Andrei C.). Luckily, our program directors and advisors (Jessica, Jonathan, and Suzie) came up with the idea to try out a practice case–one that allowed us to get feedback from a diverse panel of faculty and staff from campus (and even a former competition team member) to help us learn about areas where we could improve and areas of expertise.

Dartmouth Mobilizes Resources for Nepal Aid

April 27, 2015  

In an article for Dartmouth Now, Kenneth Bauer, program manager of human development initiatives at the Dickey Center, stressed the importance of working with established humanitarian organizations with a presence in Nepal as a way to help Nepal following a devastating earthquake and ongoing aftershocks. Bauer and others are concerned that relief efforts reach the remote villages cut off from Kathmandu.

“Traveling in Nepal for 26 years now, there has always been this dichotomy between Kathmandu, the capital, and the rest of Nepal,” Bauer says to Dartmouth Now. “One of the things we’re very concerned about and trying to think strategically about is how it’s helpful to get to villages and rural communities, and what does their future look like in terms of rebuilding.”

The community is invited to a 6 p.m. meeting in Silsby Hall, room 317, to continue discussion of how the College community can help with relief efforts in Nepal.

Read the entire Dartmouth Now story. 

 

Students Intern at the CDC During the Ebola Response

by Ian Speers ’17, Allessandra LeDoux ’17, and Kristina Mani ’16

March 16, 2015

During our ten-week internship, we were welcomed into the dynamic and fast-paced environment of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) during the agency’s largest emergency response in history: the fight against Ebola in West Africa. While the number of Ebola cases has been declining globally, the amount of effort directed to controlling the disease has been astounding to watch.

For the Ebola response, DGMQ consolidated a group of experts and frontline responders to form the Global Migration Task Force (GMTF). This task force is responsible for all travel-related aspects of the Ebola response. Enhanced entry screening not only identifies travelers who may be sick with Ebola or may have had an exposure to Ebola when they arrive in the United States, but also ensures that these travelers are directed to appropriate care and monitoring, if needed, and equips travelers to help them monitor themselves for symptoms and report to their health department for active monitoring.

Student Global Health Blogs Around the World

Undergraduate, graduate and medical students supported by the Dickey Center's Global Health Initiative have been working around the world in medical and health settings. Their blogs from Rwanda, India, Peru, Kosovo and elsewhere tell the story of their experiences in the field.

 

Helping Peru Prepare for an Emergency

by Kelsey Wheeler '14

Global Health Initiative Fellowship, Peru, Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia

All eyes were focused on the twenty-year-old Dartmouth student in the front of the room. Bridget Golob '14 looked back at the sea of unfamiliar faces and began presenting in their native language: Spanish. Her mentor, Dr. Raul Acosta, E.R. Chief at Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia, looked on quietly from the back. He had done much to prepare Bridget for this day, connecting her to resources throughout the city of Lima, Peru, and offering advice. But today, his primary contribution was driving Bridget into one of the city’s slums, Villa Maria del Triunfo, to present her work on emergency disaster preparedness to community members.

Weeks earlier, Bridget had arrived in Lima eager to begin the off-term experience she had been offered through the Dickey Center’s Global Health Initiative (GHI) Fellowship program and The Dartmouth Center for Healthcare Delivery (TDC), one of many on and off campus opportunities offered through the Dickey Center.

Emory Case Competition

Application deadline: 2016 TBD. 

Apply Here!

Dartmouth is competing in the 2015 Emory International Global Health Case Competition! Students from at least three schools (undergraduate, Geisel, Tuck, Thayer, TDI) will be selected as part of an interdisciplinary team of 4-6 students. The competition will take place at Emory University on Saturday, March 28, 2015. 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Health
Close
The John Sloan Dickey Center