Human Development

Chair of Geography
Professor of Geography and Environmental Studies

My research and teaching interests come together around the question of how to reconcile human activities with the long-term resilience and vulnerability of ecological systems. Most of my work has focused on human uses of water and, in particular, on the transformation of river basins due to large-scale development. Much of this research has focused on "third world" settings in the twentieth century-e.g., the Mekong River Basin-but has applications to a variety of historical and geographical contexts. One of my primary interests is analysis of social conflicts over water, and a current project (working with colleagues in Dartmouth's Geography Department) examines the social dimensions of dam removal in New England. At a theoretical level, I draw inspiration from ongoing discussions in political ecology, ecological theory, concepts of power, how to think about geographical scale, and ideas regarding nature-society relations. I recently completed a book titled Concrete Revolution: Large Dams, Cold War Geopolitics, and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation published by the University of Chicago Press and due for release in September 2015. At Dartmouth, I teach courses on political ecology, nature-society relations, qualitative research methods, the geopolitics of development, the envrionmental politics of Southeast Asia, and environmental history.

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My education and experiences over the past 15 years reflect these interests. After receiving a B.S. in Zoology from the University of Wisconsin in 1987, I served in the U.S. Peace Corps as a fisheries volunteer in the province of Kalinga-Apayao, Republic of the Philippines from 1988 to 1990. This was a transformative experience, and paved the way for my current interests in combining ecological knowledge and social theory to address complex environmental dilemmas in the context of internaitonal development. I completed my M.S. in Resource Policy and Planning at the University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources and Environment in 1993. My Master's research focused on environmental movements in Southeast Asia. My doctoral research, which culminated with a Ph.D. in Geography at the University of Minnesota in 2000, focused on conflicts over water in Northeast Thailand. 

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Curriculum Vitae
Fairchild 123
Department:
Environmental Studies
Geography
Center:
The John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding
Education:
B.S. University of Wisconsin
M.S. University of Michigan
Ph.D. University of Minnesota

Selected Publications

Sneddon, C. In Press. Concrete Revolution: The Bureau of Reclamation, Cold War Geopolitics and Large Dams. Chicago: University of Chicago Press (expected September 2015).

Sneddon, C. 2013. “Water, governance and hegemony.” In Harris, L., Goldin, J. and C. Sneddon (eds) Contemporary Water Governance in the Global South: Scarcity, Marketization and Participation. New York: Routledge, pp. 13-24.

Sneddon, C. 2012. The “Sinew of Development”: Cold War geopolitics, technological expertise and river alteration in Southeast Asia, 1954-1975. Social Studies of Science 42(4):564-590.

Sneddon, C. and C. Fox. 2012. Inland capture fisheries and large river systems: A political economy of Mekong fisheries. Journal of Agrarian Change 12(2/3):279-299.

Sneddon, C. and C. Fox. 2012. Water, geopolitics, and economic development in the conceptualization of a region. Eurasian Geography and Economics 53(1):143-160.

Sneddon, C. and C. Fox. 2011. The Cold War, the US Bureau of Reclamation and the technopolitics of river basin development, 1950-1970. Political Geography, 30(8):450-460.

Sneddon, C. and C. Fox. 2008. Power, development and institutional change: participatory governance in the Lower Mekong basin. World Development 35(12):2161-2181.

Sneddon, C. 2007. “Nature’s” materiality and the circuitous paths of accumulation: dispossession of riverine fisheries in Cambodia. Antipode 39(1):167-193.

Sneddon, C., Howarth, R. B. and R. B. Norgaard. 2006. Sustainable Development in a Post-Brundtland World. Ecological Economics 57:253-268.

Sneddon, C. and C. Fox. 2006. Rethinking transboundary waters: a critical hydropolitics of the Mekong basin. Political Geography 25:181-202.

Sneddon, C. 2003. Reconfiguring scale and power: the Khong-Chi-Mun project in Northeast Thailand. Environment and Planning A 35:2229-2250.

Sneddon, C. 2000. ‘Sustainability’ in ecological economics, ecology and livelihoods: a review. Progress in Human Geography 24(4): 521-549.

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Sandra L. and Arthur L. Irving '72a P'10 Professor of Economics
Director, Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

I joined the faculty of Dartmouth in 1994. My early scholarly work covered a range of topics, including pensions, saving, taxation, portfolio choice, and executive compensation. My teaching, and some of my more recent scholarship, has expanded to include other topics in finance, public policy, and social entrepreneurship.

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In 2003 – 2004, I joined the staff of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, serving for a year as its chief economist. Since returning to campus in 2004, I have been the director of the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center, an interdisciplinary social science center that seeks to educate, train, and inspire the next generation of public policy leaders.

In November 2009, I was selected as the New Hampshire Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education.

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Curriculum Vitae Personal Website Twitter LinkedIn
112 Rockefeller
Department:
Economics
Quantitative Social Science
Center:
The John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding
The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy
Education:
A.B. Harvard College, 1989
Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1993

Selected Publications

“Effects of Income Tax Changes on Economic Growth,” Forthcoming in Alan Auerbach, Len Burman, and Kent Smetters (eds.) The Economics of Tax Policy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. (with William G. Gale)

“Policy Forum: A Decade of Reckoning – Fiscal Policy Challenges in the United States,” Canadian Tax Journal 61:2 (2013), 413-424.

“Donating the Voucher: An Alternative Tax Treatment of Private School Enrollment,” in Jeffrey Brown (ed.) Tax Policy and the Economy 27 (2013). Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 125-160.

“The Design of Retirement Saving Programs in the Presence of Competing Consumption Needs,” National Tax Association Proceedings – 2010, 71 – 80.

Works in Progress

“The Welfare Cost of Perceived Policy Uncertainty: Evidence from Social Security”

"The Insurance Value of Financial Aid"

"Means-Testing Federal Health Entitlement Benefits"

Selected Works and Activities

Member, Census Scientific Advisory Committee

Arthur R. Virgin Professor of Music

Theodore Levin is a longtime student of music, expressive culture, and traditional spirituality in Central Asia and Siberia. As an advocate for music and musicians from other cultures, he has written books, produced recordings, curated concerts and festivals, and contributed to international arts initiatives. During an extended leave from Dartmouth, Levin served as the first executive director of the Silk Road Project, founded by cellist Yo-Yo Ma. He has also served as chair of the Arts and Culture sub-board of the Open Society (Soros) Foundations, and is currently Senior Project Consultant to the Aga Khan Music Initiative, a program of the Aga Khan Trust for Culture. His research and advocacy activities focus on the role of arts and culture in promoting and strengthening civil society, pluralism, and cosmopolitanism in countries where it is imperiled or still emerging. At Dartmouth he teaches courses on world music, sonic landscapes, music of the Silk Road region, and an interdisciplinary course on the art, science, and symbolism of musical instruments.

Department:
Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
Music
Center:
The John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding
Education:
B.A. Amherst College
M.F.A. Princeton University
Ph.D. Princeton University

Selected Publications

The Music of Central Asia, ed. Theodore Levin, Saida Daukeyeva, and Elmira Köchümkulova (Indiana University Press, 2016).

Where Rivers and Mountains Sing: Sound, Music, and Nomadism in Tuva and Beyond, (Indiana University Press, 2006, paperback 2010).

Music of Central Asia, Vols. 1-10 (CD-DVD series with notes and text translations), (Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, 2004-11).

The Hundred Thousand Fools of God: Musical Travels in Central Asia (and Queens, New York) , (Indiana University Press 1996; paperback 1999).

Works in Progress

“Timbre-Centered Listening in the Soundscape of Tuva” (co-authored with Valentina Süzükei), in The Oxford Handbook of Timbre (Oxford University Press, 2017?)

Personal Website
Silsby 203
Department:
Government
Center:
The John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding
Education:
B.A. Oberlin College
M.A. Johns Hopkins University
Ph.D. University of California, San Diego

Selected Publications

“Ties That Bind? The Rise and Decline of Ethno-Regional Partisanship in Malawi, 1994-2009.” Democratization 17(3): 534-563 (with Karen Ferree)

“Civic Education and Democratic Backsliding in the Wake of Kenya’s Post- 2007 Election Violence” Forthcoming. Journal of Politics (with Steven Finkel and Reynaldo Mendoza)

"Campaigns, Ethnic Polarizations, and Violence in Kenya's Multiethnic Democracy" (Book manuscript)

"Why Ethnicity Reduces Strategic Voting: Evidence from Kenya's 2007 Election" (with James Long)

"Power-Sharing as a Solution to Ethnic Conflict: Kenya's Experience since 2008."

"Politician-Induced Violence in Africa" Calculated Electoral Strategy or Unintended By-Product?" (with Jonas Hjort)

Assistant Professor of Government

As a cultural anthropologist, I strive to understand how and why people find meaning in power and conflict. I am fascinated by the way power is both feared and desired, contested and embraced, and the culturally unique ways in which people fight for as well as against the state and sovereignty--at the local, national, and global scale.

My past major research project focused on street politics and violence in a Haitian ghetto, and attempted to uncover the multiple and contradictory ways people compete for control over an area and for linkages with broader domains of power.

My current research project explores changing notions of citizenship, statehood, and the social contract through an ethnography of the transnational regulatory regime of criminal deportation, as manifested between the United States and Haiti. I have also written about carnival bands, graffiti, community activism, and the military in urban Haiti. I teach courses in the anthropology of violence, political anthropology, and Haitian and Caribbean studies.

Personal Website
Department:
Anthropology
Latin American, Latino and Caribbean Studies
Center:
The John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding
Education:
Ph.D., M.A., University of Chicago
M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University
B.A., Colorado College


 

Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Distinguished Associate Professor of Economics and Globalization

Curriculum Vitae Personal Website
324 Rockefeller Hall
Department:
Economics
Center:
The John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding
Associate Professor of Economics

Assistant Professor of Geography

I am a health and development geographer focusing on the impact of U.S. foreign policy on the unfolding of international health and development projects in Haiti over the past 100 years. I am interested in exploring the racialized discourses that have undergirded US interventionism as well as the social and political responses to these interventions from within Haiti. At the heart of my research is an exploration of the role and accessibility of health citizenship.

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I am currently continuing work on health citizenship beyond the nation-state. First, in examining the U.S. Occupation of Haiti from 1915-1934, and then moving to post-earthquake (Jan 12, 2010) Haiti, I examine the ways in which Haitian health citizenship has been transnationalized and continuously disrupted through health and development interventions (often militarized in implementation). At root of this project is a reading of how the political subjectivities of Haitians is understood through the lens of the United States government (by its military, its foreign relations office, and ultimately, by agencies such as USAID and Homeland Security) and how this reading impacts Haitians' claims to rights - political, economic, and social.

I have two current research projects going. The first  is an examination of the impacts of the cholera epidemic in Haiti, both as a catalyst for highlighting the need for a recognized cosmpolitical subjectivty as well as its reflection of centuries-old racialized outbreak narratives and imaginative geographies.

The second is a book project, tentatively titled Monstrous Microbes: Geography, Race and Disease Narratives, in which I examine the co-emergence of new geographies, race and racism, and disease and outbreak narratives during the early years of global exploration, and the hauntings of these onto-epistemologies for marking the boundaries of ‘humanity’ and by extension, citizenship.

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Curriculum Vitae Personal Website
6017 Fairchild, Geography
Department:
Geography
Center:
The John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding
Education:
Ph. D. University of Washington, Seattle
M.A. University of Washington
B.A. University of Washington, Seattle
Assistant Professor

Coverage of the Nepal Earthquake Summit

This year the Leila and Melville Straus 1960 Family Symposium was focused on response to the earthquake that struck Nepal in April 2015.  The Nepal Earthquake Summit took place February 18th-20th. It received a great deal of coverage leading up to the events and a great deal more following it. For a sampling of these articles, see the links below. All of the sessions throughout the summit now can be viewed on our YouTube channel

Post-Summit

  • Valley News (VT/NH), "Nepal Students Share Quake Stories," February 21st
  • The Dartmouth, "Nepal summit discusses efforts," February 18th

Pre-Summit

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Nepal Earthquake Summit Livestream

Watch events from the Nepal Earthquake Summit livestreamed here. 

 

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Nepal Earthquake Summit

The Nepal Earthquake Summit spanned three days (Feb. 18-20, 2016). A majority of the Summit sessions can be viewed on our YouTube channel. Click here for a PDF version of the agenda. The Summit also included a photographic exhibition on the Langtang Valley of Nepal, featuring photographs from Austin Lord '06, Athena Zelandonii, and Prasiit Sthapit.

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