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Shackleton Exhibits on 100th Anniversary of the Rescue of the Endurance Crew

Rauner Special Collections Library and “Pole to Pole,” an environmental studies course taught by Institute of Arctic Studies Director Ross Virginia that examines climate change in the polar regions through the lens of history, exploration and science. Fifty-one Dartmouth students shared their research to produce this exhibit exploring Shackleton and the Antarctica of his time.

The exhibit —“We look for light from within”: Shackleton’s Indomitable Spirit — is open to the public until September 2, 2016. View a related exhibit in the Russo Gallery of the Haldeman Center about Institute of Arctic Studies programs to take young, budding scientists to Antarctica and Greenland. 

Gone South for the Winter -- to Antarctica

February 17, 2015  |  Dartmouth Now by Joseph Blumberg

Dartmouth undergraduate Diana Wise ’15 spent two weeks of her winter break in the dramatic domain of Antarctica, an experience she captured in a blog, “Gone South For the Winter,” which she filed from the field.

“Diana participated in the field portion of a multi-university Antarctica study abroad program that Environmental Studies and the Institute of Arctic Studies are supporting this year for the first time,” says Lee McDavid, the program manager at the Institute of Arctic Studies at the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding. “Diana is the first student to enroll in this program, a unique opportunity, given that most students conducting field work in Antarctica tend to be graduate students.”

How Not to Get Eaten by Polar Bears

May 8, 2014

A two-day polar safety training sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the Earth Sciences Department, and the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center focused on staying safe and responding to emergencies, including encountering, or avoiding, polar bears.

Canadian bear expert Andy McMullen spent a day with two dozen Dartmouth graduate and undergraduate students and faculty who's research takes them into Greenland, Alaska, Canada and elsewhere.

Erich Osterberg, an assistant professor in Dartmouth’s Department of Earth Sciences, says global climate change is affecting the way research is conducted. “Not all of changing field conditions that scientists face make their job easier. In Greenland, some Dartmouth scientists now carry rifles and hire guards for polar bear protection in areas where the bears were rare until a few years ago.”

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The John Sloan Dickey Center