Faculty Story

How America Can Step Up Its Leadership Role in the Arctic

April 21, 2015  |  The National Interest

The United States takes over leadership of the Arctic Council, an eight-country forum for Arctic cooperation, starting April 24, 2015? In an editorial, co-authored by Ross A. Virginia, Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center and Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, with colleagues from University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Wilson Center and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC, the authors suggest that the complex geopolitical environment and tense atmosphere in Russian relations with the West should not impinge on future Arctic cooperation. 

"Arctic issues are beyond the scientific understanding and management capacity of any single country, and cooperation is essential in the face of enormous challenges there," the authors write. 

As U.S. Assumes Arctic Council Chairmanship, New Report Emphasizes Cooperation Over Conflict

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media contact: John Cramer | john.cramer@dartmouth.edu | 603-646-9130

VIEW THE REPORT

As U.S. Assumes Arctic Council Chairmanship, New Report Emphasizes Cooperation Over Conflict

HANOVER, N.H. – April 20, 2015 – Although the media often portray the Arctic as a new “Great Game” ripe for conflict, a group of international Arctic experts co-chaired by Dartmouth College released recommendations today aimed at preserving the polar north as an area for political and military cooperation, sustainable development and scientific research.

Dartmouth a Lead on Fulbright Arctic Program

October 22, 2014  Dartmouth Now

Professor Ross Virginia, Director of the Dickey Center's Institute of Arctic Studies, was selected by the U.S. State Department as one of two distinguished scholar leaders of the newly established Fulbright Arctic Initiative. His work focuses on climate change and the effect of rapid warming on the polar regions.

Virginia, the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, and Professor Michael Sfraga, a geographer and vice chancellor for university and student advancement from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, will take lead roles in the new Fulbright Arctic research program, which will fund interdisciplinary work for some 16 scholars from the eight countries that sit on the Arctic Council, an intergovernmental forum of the eight member states that border the Arctic Circle.

Leading Social & Natural Science Organizations Merge

10/26/17  

Members of the world’s leading international science bodies, the International Council for Science (ICSU) and the International Social Science Council (ISSC), agreed in a historic vote to merge and create a unified international organization, the International Science Council. Melody Brown Burkins, Associate Director for Programs and Research at the Dickey Center for International Understanding, was part of the four-person U.S. delegation, which included two other members of the U.S. National Academies’ Board on International Scientific Organization (BISO) and the National Academies' Foreign Secretary. Burkins, who is also an Adjunct Professor of Environmental Studies and teaches a course on “The Practice of Science Policy and Diplomacy," was the only woman in the U.S. delegation.

Why the Vegas Shooter Did It

October 13, 2017  |  POLITICO MAGAZINE

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin writes in Politico Magazine on the speculation around why Stephen Paddock killed 58 people and wounded almost 500 in the worst mass killing in US history. What was his motive? Possibly simply fame, in an age when the Internet makes instant fame possible.

Paddock thus becomes the latest embodiment of a pattern that has emerged in recent decades. In a world gushing with information about fresh atrocities on the internet and social media, one where screaming chyrons and shouting talk radio hosts have become ubiquitous, a small number of individuals seek to make their mark through record-setting violence. By doing so, they hope to distinguish lives hitherto marked by insignificance or failure.

Read his article online

 

Wilson Center Features Ross Virginia in Polar Interactive

August 28, 2017

The Wilson Center in Washington, DC, has created a beautiful and important online interactive called "Into the Arctic" that considers issues facing the Arctic today. Ross Virginia is featured in the section "The Arctic Environment in the Age of Man," along with Senior Arctic Fellow Lenore Grenoble, who narrates "Interactive: Languages of the Arctic."

 

Wilson Center Names Ross Virginia Polar Initiative Fellow

July 6, 2017  |  Dartmouth News  |  Bill Platt

Three Decades of Climate Research in Antarctica

August 26, 2017  |  Valley News

by Matt Hongoltz-Hetling

After the crew members tied the helicopter down to prevent it from blowing away in what was shaping up to be one of Antarctica’s famously powerful storms, they crawled over the frozen ground to join Dartmouth Professor Ross Virginia and a handful of students in the crowded emergency shelter.

They’d seen the storm on the horizon, a solid wall of clouds rushing toward them, and soon they felt it too — winds that slammed into the small aircraft and caused it to bounce erratically. Though they were just minutes from the relative safety of McMurdo Station on Ross Island, they had to abandon their plans and seek immediate shelter on the ground.

“It was a plywood shack with a little stove in it,” Virginia recalled. “There was a radio, and bunk beds. A little table. Nine of us jammed in there.”

Read the entire article at the Valley News

Mosquitoes Getting Bigger and Badder

August 14, 2017

In a National Geographic article Lauren Culler discusses the challenge of dealing with a greater number of mosquitoes emerging in Greenland. 

 "There aren’t a lot of animals for them to eat in the Arctic, so when they finally find one, they are ferocious. They are relentless. They do not stop. They just keep going after you."

A threat to caribou as well as people, mosquitoes are emerging earlier, getting bigger and hang around longer, driven by warmer temperatures. Cullers new research has been published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Virginia Comments on Greenland Toxins in Popular Science Article

July 12, 2017  |  Popular Science

As the huge ice sheet melts, it releases toxins—and microbes that eat them, reports Poular Science magazine. They turned for comment to Professor Ross Virginia, Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies: “It’s potentially good news that degraders are found in the melting ice ecosystem." 

Read the entire article in Popular Science, July 11, 2017.

Fulbright Arctic Initiative Accepting Applications

July 12, 2017  |  Fulbright Scholar Program release

Fulbright Arctic Initiative information (pdf)

18-month research program will expand collaborative networks and address shared priorities

The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs has announced the launch of the second Fulbright Arctic Initiative.

The Fulbright Arctic Initiative is designed to create a network to stimulate international research collaboration on Arctic issues while increasing mutual understanding between people of the United States and the people of other countries.  Using a collaborative multidisciplinary model to emphasize communication across disciplines and knowledge co-production, the Initiative will translate theory into practice to address public-policy research questions relevant to Arctic Council member states’ shared challenges and opportunities.

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