Faculty Story

Dartmouth at GLACIER meeting in Alaska with Obama

August 26, 2015 |  Dartmouth Now

Updated September 3, 2015

On August 31, President Barack Obama is traveling to Anchorage to participate in the Conference on Global Leadership in the Arctic: Cooperation, Engagement and Resilience (GLACIER). Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science Ross Virginia, director of the Institute of Arctic Studies will be there along with Secretary of State John Kerry and foreign ministers of the eight countries that belong to the Arctic Council—Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the United States—as well as delegates from more than a dozen Arctic Council observer states.

CBS News Covers Dartmouth in Greenland

July 19, 2015

Greenland is ground zero for climate change research, and Dartmouth was there when a CBS Evening News crew flew from the US to Greenland to report on the rapid warming and melting taking place there.

Lauren Culler, an ecologist, and the postdoctoral fellow and outreach coordinator at the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center, was interviewed for producer T. Sean Herbert's Reporter's Notebook segment online about melt ponds near the Greenland Ice Sheet that are drying up. "Out of the 10 or so ponds that I have been keeping track of, about three of them have completely disappeared since 2012," said Culler. 

Scholars Announced for Inaugural Fulbright Arctic Initiative

US Department of State: Diplomacy in Action

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
April 21, 2015

Seventeen researchers from Arctic Council nations, including the United States, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, and Sweden will engage in collaborative thinking, analysis, problem-solving and multi-disciplinary research over the next 18 months as a part of the U.S. Department of State’s Fulbright Arctic Initiative. The diverse group of scholars will explore public-policy research questions and offer innovative solutions through a variety of disciplines ranging from geology and biology to law, sociology, global health, and art. See more information on the scholars, including their names and affiliations, here.

How America Can Step Up Its Leadership Role in the Arctic

April 21, 2015  |  The National Interest

The United States takes over leadership of the Arctic Council, an eight-country forum for Arctic cooperation, starting April 24, 2015? In an editorial, co-authored by Ross A. Virginia, Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center and Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, with colleagues from University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Wilson Center and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC, the authors suggest that the complex geopolitical environment and tense atmosphere in Russian relations with the West should not impinge on future Arctic cooperation. 

"Arctic issues are beyond the scientific understanding and management capacity of any single country, and cooperation is essential in the face of enormous challenges there," the authors write. 

As U.S. Assumes Arctic Council Chairmanship, New Report Emphasizes Cooperation Over Conflict

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media contact: John Cramer | [email protected] | 603-646-9130

VIEW THE REPORT

As U.S. Assumes Arctic Council Chairmanship, New Report Emphasizes Cooperation Over Conflict

HANOVER, N.H. – April 20, 2015 – Although the media often portray the Arctic as a new “Great Game” ripe for conflict, a group of international Arctic experts co-chaired by Dartmouth College released recommendations today aimed at preserving the polar north as an area for political and military cooperation, sustainable development and scientific research.

Dartmouth a Lead on Fulbright Arctic Program

October 22, 2014  Dartmouth Now

Professor Ross Virginia, Director of the Dickey Center's Institute of Arctic Studies, was selected by the U.S. State Department as one of two distinguished scholar leaders of the newly established Fulbright Arctic Initiative. His work focuses on climate change and the effect of rapid warming on the polar regions.

Virginia, the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, and Professor Michael Sfraga, a geographer and vice chancellor for university and student advancement from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, will take lead roles in the new Fulbright Arctic research program, which will fund interdisciplinary work for some 16 scholars from the eight countries that sit on the Arctic Council, an intergovernmental forum of the eight member states that border the Arctic Circle.

Three Decades of Climate Research in Antarctica

August 26, 2017  |  Valley News

by Matt Hongoltz-Hetling

After the crew members tied the helicopter down to prevent it from blowing away in what was shaping up to be one of Antarctica’s famously powerful storms, they crawled over the frozen ground to join Dartmouth Professor Ross Virginia and a handful of students in the crowded emergency shelter.

They’d seen the storm on the horizon, a solid wall of clouds rushing toward them, and soon they felt it too — winds that slammed into the small aircraft and caused it to bounce erratically. Though they were just minutes from the relative safety of McMurdo Station on Ross Island, they had to abandon their plans and seek immediate shelter on the ground.

“It was a plywood shack with a little stove in it,” Virginia recalled. “There was a radio, and bunk beds. A little table. Nine of us jammed in there.”

Read the entire article at the Valley News

Virginia Comments on Greenland Toxins in Popular Science Article

July 12, 2017  |  Popular Science

As the huge ice sheet melts, it releases toxins—and microbes that eat them, reports Poular Science magazine. They turned for comment to Professor Ross Virginia, Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies: “It’s potentially good news that degraders are found in the melting ice ecosystem." 

Read the entire article in Popular Science, July 11, 2017.

Is Trump Fighting Terrorism?

June 4, 2017  |  POLITICO

by Daniel Benjamin

Is Trump Fighting Terrorism?  Or is he just tweeting about it, while making it worse?

Donald Trump came to the presidency on a wave of overheated rhetoric about the terrorist threat, the failures of his predecessors, and promises, as he said in his inaugural address, to “unite the civilized world against radical Islamic terrorism, which we will eradicate completely from the face of the Earth.” Four months into his term, and on the heels of Saturday’s terrorist attack in London, which killed seven and injured dozens in the third attack in Britain in three months, it’s worth asking: Is Trump actually delivering decisive counterterrorism?

Talk Highlights Outcomes of Iranian Election

May 23, 2017  |  Valley News

An article in the Valley News highlighted Dartmouth Sociology Professor Misagh Parsa's views on the roots of a deep discord between the Iranian people and their Islamist government and pointed to possible outcomes.

Parsa, author of the book Democracy in Iran: Why It Failed and How It Might Succeed, talked only days after a major victory by Hassan Rouhani, a moderate reformer, in Iran's presidential election. 

She told the Valley News, "It’s highly unlikely for Iran to democratize through reform,” Parsa said, given that reformers have to work within the existing structures of power. “And so instead it’s likely that Iran will need to go through another revolutionary transformation.”

Professor Parsa's talk was co-sponsored by the Dickey Center and the Department of Sociology. 

Read the entire article by Rob Wolfe in the Valley News.

 

 

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