Faculty Story

Donald Trump Is Dangerously Wrong on the Immigration-Terror Link

September 1, 2016  |  TIME

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin co-authored a piece in TIME on Donald Trump's efforts to connect terrorism and immigration:

Americans who have been buffeted by Trump’s torrential negativism and 24-7 cable coverage of horrors from all corners of the earth shouldn’t buy this dim view of our immigration system—because it simply isn’t true.

The most obvious counter to Trump’s narrative is to note that not a single terrorism-related death since 9/11 was caused by foreign operatives coming into the country to cause violence—from Fort Hood to Orlando, the killings were all caused by citizens and green card holders. 

Read the entire article in TIME, co-authored with Betsy Cooper, who served as an attorney in the Department of Homeland Security. Note: Benjamin's name has been inadvertently deleted as the co-author. 

President Hanlon's Arctic Voyage

July 27, 2016  |  Dartmouth News

Next week, President Phil Hanlon ’77 and his wife, Gail Gentes, will take a look at Dartmouth’s impact in one of the most remote places in the world—the Arctic.

With a group of about 30 people—mostly alumni and their families—Hanlon and Gentes will be part of a 10-day expedition to Greenland and the Arctic Circle led by Ross Virginia, the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science and the director of the Institute of Arctic Studies at the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding.

“Gail and I are excited about participating in this trip, and especially seeing firsthand the field research of Dartmouth’s students and faculty, who are shaping our understanding of one of the most critical issues of our time: the effects of rapid climate change around the globe,” says President Hanlon of the trip, which is sponsored by Alumni Travel.

Read the full story at Dartmouth News

Also:

Mark Brzezinski '87 Talks to MCON about the Arctic

July 20, 2016

Mark Brzezinski '87, former ambassador to Sweden and the White House Executive Director of the Arctic Executive Steering Committee, spoke to ‪#‎MCON‬ 2016 on June 20. He presented "What Happens in the Arctic Does Not Stay in the Arctic" was to leaders, activists and social entrepreneurs looking for creative solutions for social issues.

Ambassador Brzezinski's presentation can be viewed on YouTube.

 

 

 

 

Shackleton Exhibits on 100th Anniversary of the Rescue of the Endurance Crew

Rauner Special Collections Library and “Pole to Pole,” an environmental studies course taught by Institute of Arctic Studies Director Ross Virginia that examines climate change in the polar regions through the lens of history, exploration and science. Fifty-one Dartmouth students shared their research to produce this exhibit exploring Shackleton and the Antarctica of his time.

The exhibit —“We look for light from within”: Shackleton’s Indomitable Spirit — is open to the public until September 2, 2016. View a related exhibit in the Russo Gallery of the Haldeman Center about Institute of Arctic Studies programs to take young, budding scientists to Antarctica and Greenland. 

How Not to Save the World

Dartmouth Now | March 22, 2016

“Now, the challenge is try to unlearn all the socialization that to this point has brought you academic accolades. You must resist the temptation to share every great thought or idea you have. You must switch into listener mode,” says the Geisel School of Medicine’s Lisa Adams in a Washington Post opinion piece about American students going to poor countries to do good works.

Adams is an associate professor of medicine and of community and family medicine and the associate dean for global health at Geisel. She leads the Global Health Initiative at the Dickey Center. 

Alumnus is Global Leader in Arctic Research

Dartmouth Alumni News |  March 10, 2016

John Walsh ’70 is one the world’s most prominent Arctic scientists, and his journey to the top of the globe started 4,500 miles away as an undergraduate at Dartmouth.

Now the chief scientist at the University of Alaska Fairbank’s International Arctic Research Center, Walsh was recently named the recipient of the 2016 International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) medal for his “exceptional and sustained contributions to the understanding of the Arctic.” He will be presented with the award during Arctic Science Summit Week in Fairbanks, which begins March 12.

Ross Virginia, director of Dartmouth’s Institute of Arctic Studies and the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, says Walsh is highly deserving of the recognition. “IASC is the major international organization dealing with Arctic science and science logistics, and this is their highest honor for scientific achievement,” he says. “John Walsh’s work on climate modeling and climate prediction has been central to understanding relationships between temperature change, snow, and sea ice change.”

Ecosystems Vulnerable to Climate Change

February 3, 2016

Science Focus, the BBC's online magazine, quoted Ross Virginia on the ecosystems vulnerable to climate change, including Antarctica. 

“A small increase in temperature can tip the ecosystem from frozen to melting, turning patches of desert into a wetland,” says Prof Ross Virginia, Director of the Dickey Center’s Institute of Arctic Studies at Dartmouth College in the US. “That makes the soil a very different kind of habitat for the organisms living there, and it can change the cycling of carbon and the release of carbon dioxide.”

#JASE16 in Antarctica

The Joint Antarctic Science Expedition has landed after traveling from Miami to Santiago to Punta Arenas, Chile,...to Antarctica.

Follow their continuing adventures!

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin Testifies on U.S.-Syria Strategy

On September 29th Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin provided testimony to the U.S. House of Representative's Subcommittee on Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade. The topic of the hearing was: "U.S. Counterterrorism Efforts in Syria: A Winning Strategy?" In testimony he submitted, Benjamin wrote: 

In Syria today, there is no shortage of reasons to be dispirited. But I am persuaded that what we require above all is strategic patience and perseverance. We learned all too painfully in Iraq the costs of haste. I strongly believe that we have the time and tools to reduce the danger of terrorist attack, and that we will benefit from a strategy that is careful, deliberate and cognizant of all the technologies and political trends that will help us.

The full text of his statement can be read here. And the video of the hearing can be viewed here.

Arctic Mosquitoes Thriving Under Climate Change

Dartmouth Media contact: John Cramer | [email protected]h.edu | 603-646-9130

HANOVER, N.H. – Sept. 15, 2015 – Warming temperatures are causing Arctic mosquitoes to grow faster and emerge earlier, significantly boosting their population and threatening the caribou they feast on, a Dartmouth College study finds.

The study predicts the mosquitoes’ probability of surviving and emerging as adults will increase by more than 50 percent if Arctic temperatures rise 2 °C. The findings are important because changes in the timing and intensity of their emergence affect their role as pests of people and wildlife, as pollinators of tundra plants and as food for other species, including Arctic and migratory birds.

The researchers say the climate-population model they developed for Arctic mosquitoes and their predators can be generalized to any ecosystem where survival depends on sensitivities to changing temperatures.

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