First Person

Student is Arctic Council Delegate in Russia

A Week as an Arctic Council Delegate in Arkhangelsk, Russia (reprinted from ARCUS)

by Ali Giese, PhD Candidate, Earth Sciences

During the last week of February 2014, I had the privilege of representing the United States and Dartmouth College at the 2014 Model Arctic Council, a role-playing program with the same goals as the better-known Model UN: to expose students to high-level policy negotiations through experience and participation. The Model Arctic Council was held at the Northern Arctic Federal University (NArFU) in Arkhangelsk, Russia. Thirty graduate students from more than ten countries participated in simulated proceedings of the Arctic Council, a high-level intergovernmental forum for promoting cooperation, coordination, and interaction among the Arctic States, with the involvement of Arctic indigenous communities, on common Arctic issues.

Science in Greenland: It's a Girl Thing

The IGERT Polar Environmental Change PhD Program at the Institute of Arctic Studies sends a number of young women into the field to do polar science and engineering. In fact a majority of the 24 IGERT fellows are women. 

After a recent field season in Greenland, they wanted to show their enthusiasm for science and field work by creating a video. Read about some of the reasons they created it and watch it for yourself on YouTube.

 

IGERT Nina Lany Presents at NOAC Conference

by Nina Lany, Dartmouth IGERT Fellow

Attending the 5th North American Ornithological Conference (NAOC) was a great experience, especially for a PhD student who does not specialize in bird research! Over 1,400 people from 25 countries came together in Vancouver, British Columbia from August 14-18, 2012, to present on all things bird related. I was impressed by the combination of excellent fundamental research in ecology and evolution and work that is truly able to inform conservation and policy.

Black-throated blue warbler nest containing 2-3 day old nestlings at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in NH. Photo: Charlie Governali

Reflections on Being a War and Peace Fellow

by Utkarsh Agarwal ’13, War and Peace Fellow

I was admitted into the War and Fellows Program in 2010 as a sophomore, and returned as a fellow for my junior and senior years. In my four years at Dartmouth, the W&P Fellows program has been one of the most insightful and exciting opportunities where I got to interact and learn from my peers just as much as I learnt from the guest speakers. As an engineering major at Dartmouth, the W&P Fellows Program allowed me to pursue my passion of international affairs without the burden of readings or homework.

Throughout the year, W&P Fellows get unfettered access to a long list of well-accomplished people including ex-ambassadors, war veterans, CIA analysts, activists and journalists who visit campus to give public talks. Fellows get the opportunity to speak to these guests in a candid, off-the-record, dinner setting. The W&P Fellows program is also self-driven in the sense that any Fellow can request to bring in a guest speaker to campus, and Dickey will fund their visit.

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