In the News

Shackleton Exhibits on 100th Anniversary of the Rescue of the Endurance Crew

Rauner Special Collections Library and “Pole to Pole,” an environmental studies course taught by Institute of Arctic Studies Director Ross Virginia that examines climate change in the polar regions through the lens of history, exploration and science. Fifty-one Dartmouth students shared their research to produce this exhibit exploring Shackleton and the Antarctica of his time.

The exhibit —“We look for light from within”: Shackleton’s Indomitable Spirit — is open to the public until September 2, 2016. View a related exhibit in the Russo Gallery of the Haldeman Center about Institute of Arctic Studies programs to take young, budding scientists to Antarctica and Greenland. 

Dartmouth to Host Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media contact: Amy Olson | 603-646-3274

HANOVER, N.H. – June 9, 2016 – As one of the academic hosts to the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders, the center of President Obama's Young African Leadership Initiative (YALI), Dartmouth will welcome 25 of Africa’s brightest emerging business leaders and entrepreneurs for a six-week academic and leadership institute in business and entrepreneurship, from June 19 to July 31. This is the third year Dartmouth will host a cohort of Mandela Washington Fellows. 

Students Attend Matariki Global Citizenship Meeting

A group of 27 faculty and students from six partner institutions in the Matariki Network of Universities (MNU) came together for a multi-institutional, faculty-student workshop in Uppsala, Sweden, April 18-21, 2016. It was the first meeting of the Global Citizenship Programme. The Dartmouth delegation included Dickey Center Associate Director for Programs and Research and Adjunct Professor, Melody Brown Burkins (PhD ’98), Victor Cabrera ’19, and Freya Jamison ’17 as well as Assistant Provost Laurel Stavis and Research Professor Ron Edsforth.

The event focused on developing the future of the new Global Citizenship Programme, which aims to set up substantial links and projects around global citizenship between and within partner universities. The programme can cover both education and research, along with outreach activities, but it initially is focused on the following strands:

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin on the Attacks in Brussels

In the wake of the ISIS-sponsored terror attacks in Brussels, Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin has been called upon to provide insight on the future of terror in Europe and the United States, and what can be done to prevent future attacks. Benjamin has appeared on the following programs and wrote a piece for Politico Magazine, "Is America Next?" published on March 22nd.

How Not to Save the World

Dartmouth Now | March 22, 2016

“Now, the challenge is try to unlearn all the socialization that to this point has brought you academic accolades. You must resist the temptation to share every great thought or idea you have. You must switch into listener mode,” says the Geisel School of Medicine’s Lisa Adams in a Washington Post opinion piece about American students going to poor countries to do good works.

Adams is an associate professor of medicine and of community and family medicine and the associate dean for global health at Geisel. She leads the Global Health Initiative at the Dickey Center. 

Students at Model Arctic Council in Alaska

Four Dartmouth students are participating in a unique biennial meeting that gives them hands-on experience in international politics, leadership, and collaboration on an international scale.

The Model Arctic Council (MAC) draws students from across the Arctic and the world to simulate the work of the Arctic Council, a leading intergovernmental forum promoting cooperation, coordination and interaction among the Arctic states, Arctic Indigenous communities and other Arctic inhabitants. This year MAC is being held at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, March 9-15, 2016. 

Alumnus is Global Leader in Arctic Research

Dartmouth Alumni News |  March 10, 2016

John Walsh ’70 is one the world’s most prominent Arctic scientists, and his journey to the top of the globe started 4,500 miles away as an undergraduate at Dartmouth.

Now the chief scientist at the University of Alaska Fairbank’s International Arctic Research Center, Walsh was recently named the recipient of the 2016 International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) medal for his “exceptional and sustained contributions to the understanding of the Arctic.” He will be presented with the award during Arctic Science Summit Week in Fairbanks, which begins March 12.

Ross Virginia, director of Dartmouth’s Institute of Arctic Studies and the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, says Walsh is highly deserving of the recognition. “IASC is the major international organization dealing with Arctic science and science logistics, and this is their highest honor for scientific achievement,” he says. “John Walsh’s work on climate modeling and climate prediction has been central to understanding relationships between temperature change, snow, and sea ice change.”

Polar Passion

February 2016

The Dartmouth Engineering Magazine this month has a story about Thayer PhD graduate student Alden Adolph, who accompanied fifteen high school students to Greenland last summer with the Joint Science Education Project (JSEP), funded by the National Science Foundation. JSEP is run jointly by the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center for International Understanding and the Government of Greenland. The students are from the US, Greenland and Denmark.

Adolph was accompanied by Thayer PhD candidate Amber Whelsky and Lauren Culler, Co-PI of JSEP and a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute of Arctic Studies. Adolph and Culler were students in the Polar Environmental Change IGERT. 

Ecosystems Vulnerable to Climate Change

February 3, 2016

Science Focus, the BBC's online magazine, quoted Ross Virginia on the ecosystems vulnerable to climate change, including Antarctica. 

“A small increase in temperature can tip the ecosystem from frozen to melting, turning patches of desert into a wetland,” says Prof Ross Virginia, Director of the Dickey Center’s Institute of Arctic Studies at Dartmouth College in the US. “That makes the soil a very different kind of habitat for the organisms living there, and it can change the cycling of carbon and the release of carbon dioxide.”

#JASE16 in Antarctica

The Joint Antarctic Science Expedition has landed after traveling from Miami to Santiago to Punta Arenas, Chile,...to Antarctica.

Follow their continuing adventures!

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