In the News

Dickey Director Comments on the Paris Attacks

Following the November 14th attacks on Paris, Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin and Senior Fellow Steven Simon penned an op-ed for the New York Times considering whether a similar attack could happen on U.S. soil. After the op-ed appeared, Benjamin participated in a number of interviews discussing the French and international response and potential next steps for countering the Islamic State. Benjamin's appearances and interviews can be viewed at the links below: 

Oh, Canada!

October 22, 2015

Leehi Yona '16, a Senior Fellow Stamps Scholar, and Presidential Fellow with Professor Ross Virginia in environmental studies, has published an editorial in the Montreal Gazette on expectations for newly-elected Justin Trudeau. Her editorial, "On climate change, Justin Trudeau's positive rhetoric won't be enough," calls on Trudeau to go beyond his "In Canada, better is always possible" rhetoric. She writes, "The positive rhetoric is welcome, but it is not enough. Canadians expect him to work hard toward positive climate action for the future of young generations."

Read her entire op-ed.

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin Testifies on U.S.-Syria Strategy

On September 29th Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin provided testimony to the U.S. House of Representative's Subcommittee on Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade. The topic of the hearing was: "U.S. Counterterrorism Efforts in Syria: A Winning Strategy?" In testimony he submitted, Benjamin wrote: 

In Syria today, there is no shortage of reasons to be dispirited. But I am persuaded that what we require above all is strategic patience and perseverance. We learned all too painfully in Iraq the costs of haste. I strongly believe that we have the time and tools to reduce the danger of terrorist attack, and that we will benefit from a strategy that is careful, deliberate and cognizant of all the technologies and political trends that will help us.

The full text of his statement can be read here. And the video of the hearing can be viewed here.

Arctic Mosquitoes Thriving Under Climate Change

Dartmouth Media contact: John Cramer | [email protected] | 603-646-9130

HANOVER, N.H. – Sept. 15, 2015 – Warming temperatures are causing Arctic mosquitoes to grow faster and emerge earlier, significantly boosting their population and threatening the caribou they feast on, a Dartmouth College study finds.

The study predicts the mosquitoes’ probability of surviving and emerging as adults will increase by more than 50 percent if Arctic temperatures rise 2 °C. The findings are important because changes in the timing and intensity of their emergence affect their role as pests of people and wildlife, as pollinators of tundra plants and as food for other species, including Arctic and migratory birds.

The researchers say the climate-population model they developed for Arctic mosquitoes and their predators can be generalized to any ecosystem where survival depends on sensitivities to changing temperatures.

The King and ISIS

September 10, 2015  

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin writes in the journal Foreign Policy about the seemingly contradictory alliance between the U.S. and Saudi Arabia. Why hasn't the U.S. pressed Saudi Arabia more strongly to curb it's support for extremism? 

Benjamin writes, "Wahhabism has been a devastating invasive species in Islam’s enormous ecosystem — it’s the zebra mussel, the Asian Tiger mosquito, and the emerald ash borer wrapped into one."

Read the entire article at Foreign Policy online.

 

Diplomacy at the Top of the World

August 26, 2015

On August 31, in Anchorage, Alaska, the U.S. will convene foreign ministers from Arctic and non-Arctic states to discuss climate change and other topics concerning the region. According to an opinion piece in Project Syndicate, co-authored by Ross Virginia, Director of the Institute of Artic Studies, it is important that disagreements such as Iran's nuclear program and the conflict in Ukraine not derail discussions about the Arctic, where cooperation between Russia and the West has been the norm.

Steven Simon Talks about Islamic State Brides

August 8, 2015  |  Dartmouth Now

Dickey Center Visiting Fellow Steven Simon talked to the PBS Newshour about the alienation that motivates young women to leave their homes in the West and seek out ISIS. The report follows a New York Times story about three teenage girls who left their homes in Great Britain to join the terrorist group. 

"I don’t think it’s a huge mystery," said Simon. "In the case of these young women, I think what we just heard was quite right, namely, that what is pulling these young women to Syria is the same thing that pulls young men."

Simon, who is also a lecturer in the government department, will be on campus to teach three classes this year. 

Listen to his entire interview on the PBS Newshour.

Dartmouth and Greenland Lead International Teens to the Arctic

August 13, 2015

Dartmouth Now reports on Dartmouth's contribution to the Joint Science Education Project (JSEP), a program jointly funded and led by the Government of Greenland and the US, that takes teens from the US, Greenland, and Denmark to Greenland to learn about science and undertake independent research projects. 

Lauren Culler, postdoctoral fellow and science outreach coordinator for the Institute of Arctic Studies, co-leads the program with the Institute's Director, Ross Virgina. “The overall goal was getting the students to learn to ask testable scientific questions and work with the graduate students to design and complete a project,” says Culler.

Read the entire story at Dartmouth Now.

 

Benjamin: Schumer's Unconvincing Pose

August 12, 2015

The New York Daily News published Dickey Center Director Dan Benjamin's analysis of what he calls Schumer's "seriously flawed" explanation for opposing the Obama administration's nuclear deal with Iran.

"The Iranians would take a Congressional-led rejection of the pact as proof that Washington could not deliver an acceptable deal, and they would walk away – likely pressing ahead on their nuclear program, but without any international oversight or inspections," writes Benjamin.

Read his entire opinion at the The New York Daily News.

Climate Change and Mosquitoes: Desperate and Hungry

“They’re aggressive because they’re desperate,” Lauren Culler, a postdoctoral fellow and outreach coordinator for the Institute of Arctic Studies, tells a journalist from Motherboard website about the mosquitoes swarming Greenland. “My research here has found that only 12-15 percent of mosquitoes ever get a blood meal." 

Culler has been studying the shallow ponds in Western Greenland where mosquitoes spend much of their lives to determine how the rapidly warming climate affects mosquitoes and caribou, as well as people.

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