Publication

How America Can Step Up Its Leadership Role in the Arctic

April 21, 2015  |  The National Interest

The United States takes over leadership of the Arctic Council, an eight-country forum for Arctic cooperation, starting April 24, 2015? In an editorial, co-authored by Ross A. Virginia, Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center and Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, with colleagues from University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Wilson Center and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC, the authors suggest that the complex geopolitical environment and tense atmosphere in Russian relations with the West should not impinge on future Arctic cooperation. 

"Arctic issues are beyond the scientific understanding and management capacity of any single country, and cooperation is essential in the face of enormous challenges there," the authors write. 

As U.S. Assumes Arctic Council Chairmanship, New Report Emphasizes Cooperation Over Conflict

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media contact: John Cramer | [email protected] | 603-646-9130

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As U.S. Assumes Arctic Council Chairmanship, New Report Emphasizes Cooperation Over Conflict

HANOVER, N.H. – April 20, 2015 – Although the media often portray the Arctic as a new “Great Game” ripe for conflict, a group of international Arctic experts co-chaired by Dartmouth College released recommendations today aimed at preserving the polar north as an area for political and military cooperation, sustainable development and scientific research.

Just What Is Trump Trying to Do in Syria?

April 14, 2017  |  POLITICO MAGAZINE

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin, writing in POLITICO Magazine with co-author Steven Simon, asks what foreign policy objective President Trump's limited raid on the Syrian air base on April 6, 2017, was meant to deliver. 

Let’s start with the the scale of the air raid itself. In the annals of pinprick strikes, Trump’s Tomahawk attack now stands as the pinprickiest. 

Read the entire article in POLITICO.

Oh, Canada!

October 22, 2015

Leehi Yona '16, a Senior Fellow Stamps Scholar, and Presidential Fellow with Professor Ross Virginia in environmental studies, has published an editorial in the Montreal Gazette on expectations for newly-elected Justin Trudeau. Her editorial, "On climate change, Justin Trudeau's positive rhetoric won't be enough," calls on Trudeau to go beyond his "In Canada, better is always possible" rhetoric. She writes, "The positive rhetoric is welcome, but it is not enough. Canadians expect him to work hard toward positive climate action for the future of young generations."

Read her entire op-ed.

Arctic Mosquitoes Thriving Under Climate Change

Dartmouth Media contact: John Cramer | [email protected] | 603-646-9130

HANOVER, N.H. – Sept. 15, 2015 – Warming temperatures are causing Arctic mosquitoes to grow faster and emerge earlier, significantly boosting their population and threatening the caribou they feast on, a Dartmouth College study finds.

The study predicts the mosquitoes’ probability of surviving and emerging as adults will increase by more than 50 percent if Arctic temperatures rise 2 °C. The findings are important because changes in the timing and intensity of their emergence affect their role as pests of people and wildlife, as pollinators of tundra plants and as food for other species, including Arctic and migratory birds.

The researchers say the climate-population model they developed for Arctic mosquitoes and their predators can be generalized to any ecosystem where survival depends on sensitivities to changing temperatures.

Potentially Vast Microbial Habitat Discovered in Antarctica

April 30, 2015  |  Dartmouth Now

Using a novel, helicopter-borne sensor to penetrate the surface of large swathes of terrain, a team of researchers, including Ross Virginia, Director of Dartmouth's Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center and Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) has gathered compelling evidence that beneath Antarctica's ice-free McMurdo Dry Valleys lies a salty aquifer that may support previously unknown microbial ecosystems and retain evidence of ancient climate change, stated a press release from NSF.

The Division of Polar Programs in NSF's Geoscience's Directorate supported the AEM sensor project through a collaborative award to Mikucki, Tulaczyk and Virginia. 

Manuscript Reviews Shape Faculty Books

January 19, 2015 |  Dartmouth Now

Manuscript review seminars at the Dickey Center and the Leslie Center for the Humanities, both located in the Haldeman Center, provide faculty with serious feedback on their books in progress. 

Dean of the Faculty Michael Mastanduno developed the manuscript review program when he was director of the Dickey Center from 1997 to 2003. It was so popular, says Colleen Boggs, director of the Leslie Center, that the Dickey Center began to collaborate with them to help faculty with humanities projects. The Dickey Center program focuses on manuscripts with an international scope.

Student Writes About How To Make Policy

Julia Bradley-Cook, a PhD candidate in ecology and evolutionary biology, published an article about science policy in "Witness the Arctic," a publication of ARCUS (Arctic Research Consortium of the United States). She was selected by the American Meteorological Society (AMS) to attend a summer 2014 colloquium on science policy in Washington, DC. Bradley-Cook, an IGERT Fellow, was selected along with Gifford Wong and Alexandra Giese, PhD candidates in earth sciences and IGERT Fellows. 

Germany’s foreign policy: Time to step up (Boston Globe)

May 29, 2014

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin writes in an opinion piece in The Boston Globe that it's time for Germany to "rise to the occasion" and get more involved in foreign policy issues.

Read the entire piece in The Boston Globe.

Terror Takes a Hit in Yemen (Boston Globe)

April 28, 2014

In an opinion piece in The Boston Globe, Dartmouth’s Daniel Benjamin says that despite widespread pessimism about the fight against Al Qaeda, there are successes worth acknowledging.

One of these is Yemen, says Benjamin, the Norman E. McCullough Jr. Director of the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding and the former coordinator for counterterrorism at the U.S State Department. “Yemen, as demonstrated by the counterterrorism strikes that killed more than 50 militants earlier in the week, is a little-reported success story,” he writes.

Read the full opinion piece, published 4/27/14 by The Boston Globe.

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