Student Story

Kosovo’s Ex-President Praises Students’ Policy Research Work

October 17, 2016  |  Dartmouth News

After a summer in Kosovo conducting a national study of women’s access to health care, four Dartmouth students had the chance to present their policy report to the country’s former president, who was in residence at Dartmouth as a Montgomery Fellow.

“The students’ findings clearly reflected the situation in the country as I know it,” says Atifete Jahjaga, whose Dartmouth fellowship was also supported by the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding.

“This is useful work. Upon my return to Kosovo I am happy to pass on the findings to the prime minister and the minister of health so they can address this issue and work on improving the public health policy in Kosovo,” says Jahjaga, the first woman to serve as president of the Balkan nation.

IGERT Students Publish Research on Climate Change & Arctic Soils

EurekAlert AAAS  |  March 16, 2016

Warmer, wetter conditions in the Arctic are accelerating the loss of carbon stored in tundra and permafrost soils, creating a potential positive feedback that further boosts global temperatures, a Dartmouth College study finds.

Working with the Kosovo Women's Network

“Some people ask: ‘Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights, or something like that?’ Because that would be dishonest. Feminism is, of course, part of human rights in general—but to choose to use the vague expression human rights is to deny the specific and particular problem of gender. It would be a way of pretending that it was not women who have, for centuries, been excluded. It would be a way of denying that the problem of gender targets women.”
—Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, We Should All Be Feminists

Antonia Hoidal ’16 completed a Global Health Internship at the Kosovo Women’s Network in Pristina, Kosovo, during the Summer of 2015.

Walking along Pristina’s Mother Theresa Boulevard at night I am always in awe of the fabulously dressed women of Kosovo. Effortlessly gliding in 3-inch heels, they saunter along the boulevard singing melodies in Albanian, while in the background, the “Ezan”—the Muslim call to prayer—echoes across the city hills.

Dartmouth at GLACIER meeting in Alaska with Obama

August 26, 2015 |  Dartmouth Now

Updated September 3, 2015

On August 31, President Barack Obama is traveling to Anchorage to participate in the Conference on Global Leadership in the Arctic: Cooperation, Engagement and Resilience (GLACIER). Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science Ross Virginia, director of the Institute of Arctic Studies will be there along with Secretary of State John Kerry and foreign ministers of the eight countries that belong to the Arctic Council—Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the United States—as well as delegates from more than a dozen Arctic Council observer states.

Rhodes Scholar is Lombard Public Service Fellow

Miriam Jerotich Kilimo ’14 of Nairobi, Kenya, has been named a Rhodes Scholar for 2015—the 76th Rhodes Scholar in Dartmouth’s history. Miriam was awarded a Lombard Public Service Fellowship this year by the Dickey Center and the Tucker Foundation for work with the Africa Coordinating Center for the Abandonment of Female Genital Mutilation (ACCAF). She is currently based at the University of Nairobi in Kenya. She is supporting the organization's efforts to sensitive different communities about the health and socio-economic effects associated with the practice. She is also involved in creating and equipping a resource center focused on compiling research and literature on female circumcision as it is practiced continent-wide.

The Effects of Off-shore Drilling on Barrow, Alaska

by Michael Berger '14, Stefansson Research Fellowship, Barrow, Alaska

My research focused on how the Barrow, Alaska community could stand to benefit from offshore oil drilling that could happen over the next several decades. I looked at how political and corporate institutions such as the North Slope Borough and the Arctic Slope
Regional Corporation are acting as players in securing benefits from the drilling.

I had to first understand the cultural and political framework and history of oil in the North Slope, including understanding the Inupiat people. This type of social science research is incredibly self-driven. There was no one telling me where to go, whom to talk to, which leads to follow and which to let drop.

Among other things, my time in Barrow allowed me to consider the role of the social scientist. In a world where knowledge is both temporally and spatially distributed, the role of the social scientist is not to generate new knowledge, but instead to learn from a situation in one place and time and share it in a different place and time period, and to find patterns or similarities between situations across both space and time.

Undergraduate Saves Lives With Her Nonprofit, SOAP

September 27, 2017  |  Dartmouth News

by Charlotte Albright

Hand washing saves lives. That’s why Sydney Kamen ’19 founded a nonprofit organization that recycles used soap from hotels and distributes it to under-resourced communities around the world.

Her advocacy work has won accolades, including the 2017 Tikkun Olam (Repairing the World) Award from the Helen Diller Family Foundation, the Prudential Spirit of Community Award, the Daily Point of Light Award, and the Robert Sheppard Leadership Award. Her work has also come to the attention of People magazine, in an article and video interview.

Kamen says she’s grateful for the public attention, but wants the spotlight to be on the problem she is trying to solve. “Over 1.8 million children die every year from diarrhea,” she says. “But mortality from infectious diseases can be cut in half through handwashing and by improving basic hygiene.”

Believing in the Power of People

by Milan Chuttani ’18

During the fall of 2016, Milan Chuttani '18 interned with the International Rescue Committee in Baltimore, Maryland. Names have been modified to preserve the anonymity of IRC clients.

I have always been passionate in making people feel welcome in communities I care about. As a student of international relations, I am also fascinated by the consequences of wars, politics, and rivalries between world powers. Interning with the Asylee Case Management team at the International Rescue Committee resettlement office in Baltimore provided me the unique ability to combine both of these interests, to work with people fleeing war and persecution from around the world, and to welcome them into their new American communities.

Poisonous Snakes and Earthquakes: Conservation in Costa Rica

by Victoria Chi '17

During the spring of 2017, Alexander Cotnoir ’19 interned in Costa Rica at Osa Conservation, an organization that works to protect the biodiversity of Osa Peninsula.

When students engage in internships abroad, they often have to adapt to new and unexpected work environments. Few students, however, have to brave thunderstorms and earthquakes, poisonous snakes and insects, and toxic plants. Environmental Studies major Alexander Cotnoir ’19 confronted all of these obstacles, fearlessly and even with excitement, during his internship in the spring of 2017.

War & Peace Fellow Publishes in Prestigious Military Journal

June 15, 2017

Charlotte Blatt '18, a Dickey Center War & Peace Fellow and government major, has published an article in Parameter, one of the U.S. military's top professional journals. "Operational Success, Strategic Failure: Assessing the 2007 Iraq Troop Surge," Blatt's sophomore seminar paper, is published in the Spring 2017 issue. 

Her paper also won the 2017 Edwin H. Sherman Family Prize, awarded by Temple University to the top undergraduate paper written on diplomacy and the use of force. According to Jeffrey Friedman, Assistant Professor of Government at Dartmouth, receiving these awards is a major accomplishment for an undergraduate. 

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