Environment

Polar & Climate Change Research

Dartmouth has forged a singular identity for combining its deep commitment to outstanding undergraduate and graduate education with distinguished research and scholarship. A new generation of faculty, undergraduate and graduate students are pursuing interdisciplinary collaboration and research as a pathway to understanding the environmental and human consequences of rapid environmental change in polar regions. 

Building Access to Clean Drinking Water

During the summer of 2017, David Ouma '20 interned with Jibu Company in Uganda, Rwanda, and Kenya. Jibu is a company that builds a network of locally owned franchises that enhance access to clean drinking water within communities. David worked with the corporate and engineering/tech teams.

by David Ouma ’20, Class of 1966 Named Intern

I spent the first part of my internship in Kampala, Uganda, where Jibu Company is quite established and has a big market presence. While there I was trained by the in-country Jibu engineer on the ultra-filtration equipment used by the franchises. During the training, I spent a considerable amount of time studying the water purification process, the chemicals used and how to assemble a model of the machine they were using.

While in Kampala, the company housed me and I lived with another employee, an American who would become a friend and a guide as I traversed the city. The company was using a franchise business model—all the equipment was owned by the corporate company—so they had to run maintenance.

Why climate change is worsening public health problems

January 25, 2018  |  The Conversation

The Dickey Center's Global Health Initiative Program Manager Anne Sosin and Dartmouth Assistant Professor of Anthropology Chelsey Kivland published an article in "The Conversation" online about the effects of climate change on public health worldwide. 

“We believe that leaders must recognize that environmental policy is health policy. Rollbacks of environmental regulations will cause far greater consequences on health, in the U.S. and globally, than any health care bill.”

They describe the burden of climate change on communities in Haiti and Puerto Rico in particular. 

Mentoring the Next Generation of Polar Scientists

December 1, 2017  |  Witness the Arctic

An article about the mentoring work of JSEP (Joint Science Education Program) written by Lauren Culler, Outreach Coordinator for the Institute of Arctic Studies, and Lee McDavid, Program Manager of the Institute of Arctic Studies, appeared in Witness the Arctic, an online publication of ARCUS (the Arctic Research Consortium of the US). 

JSEP is funded by the National Science Foundation, along with a companion program, JASE (Joint Antarctic Science Expedition). JSEP faculty take five US high school students to Greenland for a polar science education program with students and faculty from Greenland and Denmark. JASE takes four Spanish-speaking US high school students to Chile, where they join up with a group of Chilean students for an learning expedition to Antarctica. 

The Dirty Truth About Soils

Overview

In this lesson, students will delve into the world of soil science by collecting their own soil cores and analyzing the cores for water, organic matter, and total carbon content by soil strata. Students will learn how soils link many of Earth’s systems including the biosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere and how soils can tell scientists a lot about a location’s natural history and climate. 

Lesson Components

Download or view the following: 

Undergraduate Saves Lives With Her Nonprofit, SOAP

September 27, 2017  |  Dartmouth News

by Charlotte Albright

Hand washing saves lives. That’s why Sydney Kamen ’19 founded a nonprofit organization that recycles used soap from hotels and distributes it to under-resourced communities around the world.

Her advocacy work has won accolades, including the 2017 Tikkun Olam (Repairing the World) Award from the Helen Diller Family Foundation, the Prudential Spirit of Community Award, the Daily Point of Light Award, and the Robert Sheppard Leadership Award. Her work has also come to the attention of People magazine, in an article and video interview.

Kamen says she’s grateful for the public attention, but wants the spotlight to be on the problem she is trying to solve. “Over 1.8 million children die every year from diarrhea,” she says. “But mortality from infectious diseases can be cut in half through handwashing and by improving basic hygiene.”

The World of Lichens

Background

Lichens are symbiotic organisms made up of a fungus (providing structure) and an algae or cyanobacteria (providing nutrients through photosynthesis). In ecology, lichens play important roles in soil stabilization and development, nutrient cycling, and succession. In earth sciences, scientists make use of lichens to monitor pollution and to estimate the age of rock surfaces. 

The World of Lichens module includes a student-driven project and gives students hands-on practice with the scientific method.

Wilson Center Features Ross Virginia in Polar Interactive

August 28, 2017

The Wilson Center in Washington, DC, has created a beautiful and important online interactive called "Into the Arctic" that considers issues facing the Arctic today. Ross Virginia is featured in the section "The Arctic Environment in the Age of Man," along with Senior Arctic Fellow Lenore Grenoble, who narrates "Interactive: Languages of the Arctic."

 

Wilson Center Names Ross Virginia Polar Initiative Fellow

July 6, 2017  |  Dartmouth News  |  Bill Platt

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