Human Development

"Week of the Arctic" Focused on the Way Forward

The “Week of the Arctic” in Fairbanks, Alaska, May 8-14, 2017, highlighted the United States as an Arctic nation and culminated in the historic handover of the Arctic Council Chairmanship from the U.S. to Finland. Opening the week, Dartmouth and the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) hosted a daylong workshop, sponsored by the Association of International Education Administrators (AIEA), to emphasize the importance of the Arctic in research and education exchanges. The launch of the second Fulbright Arctic Initiative program, once again co-led by Dartmouth and UAF, was also announced publicly for the first time.

Dartmouth’s Melody Brown Burkins, Ph.D., Associate Director for Programs and Research at the Dickey Center for International Understanding, welcomed workshop participants and spoke about how the Arctic offered opportunities for increased scientific collaboration and student mobility as well as engagement in global issues of policy and diplomacy.

Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds Exhibit

January 6, 2017

An exhibit providing a window onto the unique culture and environment of the ‘Roof of the World' opens today at the Baker-Berry Library. "Tibetan and Himalyan Lifeworlds" explores the social and religious practices that shape life in Asia’s high mountain environments, explores the political history of the region, and describes some of the encounters between foreigners and Himalayan and Tibetan people over time. The exhibit has been curated by Senior Lecturer Kenneth Bauer and Associate Professor Sienna Craig. Bauer also leads the Human Development initiative at the Dickey Center for International Understanding. 

Davis Projects For Peace

Deadline: January 15, 2019

The Davis Projects for Peace Program supports young people to create and test their own ideas for building peace. Dartmouth students are invited to design grassroots projects that they implement in the summer. The program has enabled Dartmouth students, individually and in teams, to undertake projects aimed at the promotion of peace around the world.

Human Development Fellowship

The Human Development Fellowship program fosters a select group of Dartmouth students who want to develop the analytical competencies and gain the professional experiences they will need to help solve the complex, systemic problems underlying global poverty and economic development.

IT & Design for Development

Information Technologies (IT) and Human-Centered Design have tremendous promise in human development. These mobile technologies and culturally adaptable methods can expand opportunities for education, provide access to finance, and help entrepreneurs to make informed and cost-effective decisions. Coding and design initiatives have myriad applications in development, from early warning and emergency response systems for natural disasters, to mobile banking applications that give rural poor access to loans and bank accounts.

Building Access to Clean Drinking Water

During the summer of 2017, David Ouma '20 interned with Jibu Company in Uganda, Rwanda, and Kenya. Jibu is a company that builds a network of locally owned franchises that enhance access to clean drinking water within communities. David worked with the corporate and engineering/tech teams.

by David Ouma ’20, Class of 1966 Named Intern

I spent the first part of my internship in Kampala, Uganda, where Jibu Company is quite established and has a big market presence. While there I was trained by the in-country Jibu engineer on the ultra-filtration equipment used by the franchises. During the training, I spent a considerable amount of time studying the water purification process, the chemicals used and how to assemble a model of the machine they were using.

While in Kampala, the company housed me and I lived with another employee, an American who would become a friend and a guide as I traversed the city. The company was using a franchise business model—all the equipment was owned by the corporate company—so they had to run maintenance.

Undergraduate Saves Lives With Her Nonprofit, SOAP

September 27, 2017  |  Dartmouth News

by Charlotte Albright

Hand washing saves lives. That’s why Sydney Kamen ’19 founded a nonprofit organization that recycles used soap from hotels and distributes it to under-resourced communities around the world.

Her advocacy work has won accolades, including the 2017 Tikkun Olam (Repairing the World) Award from the Helen Diller Family Foundation, the Prudential Spirit of Community Award, the Daily Point of Light Award, and the Robert Sheppard Leadership Award. Her work has also come to the attention of People magazine, in an article and video interview.

Kamen says she’s grateful for the public attention, but wants the spotlight to be on the problem she is trying to solve. “Over 1.8 million children die every year from diarrhea,” she says. “But mortality from infectious diseases can be cut in half through handwashing and by improving basic hygiene.”

Believing in the Power of People

by Milan Chuttani ’18

During the fall of 2016, Milan Chuttani '18 interned with the International Rescue Committee in Baltimore, Maryland. Names have been modified to preserve the anonymity of IRC clients.

I have always been passionate in making people feel welcome in communities I care about. As a student of international relations, I am also fascinated by the consequences of wars, politics, and rivalries between world powers. Interning with the Asylee Case Management team at the International Rescue Committee resettlement office in Baltimore provided me the unique ability to combine both of these interests, to work with people fleeing war and persecution from around the world, and to welcome them into their new American communities.

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