Arctic

Scholars Announced for Inaugural Fulbright Arctic Initiative

US Department of State: Diplomacy in Action

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
April 21, 2015

Seventeen researchers from Arctic Council nations, including the United States, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, and Sweden will engage in collaborative thinking, analysis, problem-solving and multi-disciplinary research over the next 18 months as a part of the U.S. Department of State’s Fulbright Arctic Initiative. The diverse group of scholars will explore public-policy research questions and offer innovative solutions through a variety of disciplines ranging from geology and biology to law, sociology, global health, and art. See more information on the scholars, including their names and affiliations, here.

How America Can Step Up Its Leadership Role in the Arctic

April 21, 2015  |  The National Interest

The United States takes over leadership of the Arctic Council, an eight-country forum for Arctic cooperation, starting April 24, 2015? In an editorial, co-authored by Ross A. Virginia, Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center and Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, with colleagues from University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Wilson Center and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC, the authors suggest that the complex geopolitical environment and tense atmosphere in Russian relations with the West should not impinge on future Arctic cooperation. 

"Arctic issues are beyond the scientific understanding and management capacity of any single country, and cooperation is essential in the face of enormous challenges there," the authors write. 

As U.S. Assumes Arctic Council Chairmanship, New Report Emphasizes Cooperation Over Conflict

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media contact: John Cramer | [email protected] | 603-646-9130

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As U.S. Assumes Arctic Council Chairmanship, New Report Emphasizes Cooperation Over Conflict

HANOVER, N.H. – April 20, 2015 – Although the media often portray the Arctic as a new “Great Game” ripe for conflict, a group of international Arctic experts co-chaired by Dartmouth College released recommendations today aimed at preserving the polar north as an area for political and military cooperation, sustainable development and scientific research.

Montgomery Fellows Focus on Climate Change & Society

February 6, 2015  Dartmouth Now

Two Montgomery Fellows—a diplomat and a scientist—will be on campus this term to talk about  the theme of “Climate Change and Society.” U.S. Ambassador to Sweden Mark Brzezinski ’87 will be in residence Feb. 14- 17. His public lecture, “#OurSharedArctic: U.S. Embassy Sweden and Modern Diplomacy,” is at 4:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 16, in Filene Auditorium. His wife, the blogger Natalia Brzezinski, who writes on women’s issues, will also be on campus and is scheduled to meet with students during the residency.

Dartmouth a Lead on Fulbright Arctic Program

October 22, 2014  Dartmouth Now

Professor Ross Virginia, Director of the Dickey Center's Institute of Arctic Studies, was selected by the U.S. State Department as one of two distinguished scholar leaders of the newly established Fulbright Arctic Initiative. His work focuses on climate change and the effect of rapid warming on the polar regions.

Virginia, the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, and Professor Michael Sfraga, a geographer and vice chancellor for university and student advancement from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, will take lead roles in the new Fulbright Arctic research program, which will fund interdisciplinary work for some 16 scholars from the eight countries that sit on the Arctic Council, an intergovernmental forum of the eight member states that border the Arctic Circle.

Fear Factor, Insect Growth and Climate Change

September 23, 2014 

Research published by Lauren Culler, a Postdoctoral Arctic Fellow at the Dickey Center's Institute of Arctic Studies, shows fear as well as warming temperatures may encourage insects to "eat more and grow faster." 

Culler tells Entomology Today, "In other words, it's less about temperature and more about the overall environmental conditions that shape the growth, survival, and distribution of insects." Culler was lead author of the study, published in the journal Oecologia

Read about her research at Entomology TodayNature World News, and Science Daily.

The Effects of Off-shore Drilling on Barrow, Alaska

by Michael Berger '14, Stefansson Research Fellowship, Barrow, Alaska

My research focused on how the Barrow, Alaska community could stand to benefit from offshore oil drilling that could happen over the next several decades. I looked at how political and corporate institutions such as the North Slope Borough and the Arctic Slope
Regional Corporation are acting as players in securing benefits from the drilling.

I had to first understand the cultural and political framework and history of oil in the North Slope, including understanding the Inupiat people. This type of social science research is incredibly self-driven. There was no one telling me where to go, whom to talk to, which leads to follow and which to let drop.

Among other things, my time in Barrow allowed me to consider the role of the social scientist. In a world where knowledge is both temporally and spatially distributed, the role of the social scientist is not to generate new knowledge, but instead to learn from a situation in one place and time and share it in a different place and time period, and to find patterns or similarities between situations across both space and time.

Mentoring the Next Generation of Polar Scientists

December 1, 2017  |  Witness the Arctic

An article about the mentoring work of JSEP (Joint Science Education Program) written by Lauren Culler, Outreach Coordinator for the Institute of Arctic Studies, and Lee McDavid, Program Manager of the Institute of Arctic Studies, appeared in Witness the Arctic, an online publication of ARCUS (the Arctic Research Consortium of the US). 

JSEP is funded by the National Science Foundation, along with a companion program, JASE (Joint Antarctic Science Expedition). JSEP faculty take five US high school students to Greenland for a polar science education program with students and faculty from Greenland and Denmark. JASE takes four Spanish-speaking US high school students to Chile, where they join up with a group of Chilean students for an learning expedition to Antarctica. 

Wilson Center Features Ross Virginia in Polar Interactive

August 28, 2017

The Wilson Center in Washington, DC, has created a beautiful and important online interactive called "Into the Arctic" that considers issues facing the Arctic today. Ross Virginia is featured in the section "The Arctic Environment in the Age of Man," along with Senior Arctic Fellow Lenore Grenoble, who narrates "Interactive: Languages of the Arctic."

 

Wilson Center Names Ross Virginia Polar Initiative Fellow

July 6, 2017  |  Dartmouth News  |  Bill Platt

Three Decades of Climate Research in Antarctica

August 26, 2017  |  Valley News

by Matt Hongoltz-Hetling

After the crew members tied the helicopter down to prevent it from blowing away in what was shaping up to be one of Antarctica’s famously powerful storms, they crawled over the frozen ground to join Dartmouth Professor Ross Virginia and a handful of students in the crowded emergency shelter.

They’d seen the storm on the horizon, a solid wall of clouds rushing toward them, and soon they felt it too — winds that slammed into the small aircraft and caused it to bounce erratically. Though they were just minutes from the relative safety of McMurdo Station on Ross Island, they had to abandon their plans and seek immediate shelter on the ground.

“It was a plywood shack with a little stove in it,” Virginia recalled. “There was a radio, and bunk beds. A little table. Nine of us jammed in there.”

Read the entire article at the Valley News

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