Daniel Benjamin

Dickey Center Director Named to Holocaust Museum Council

May 8, 2017 |  Dartmouth News | Bill Platt

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin was sworn in as a member of the Council of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum—the museum’s governing body—at a ceremony in April during the national Days of Remembrance commemoration of the Holocaust. 

“Particularly at this moment, when anti-Semitism, xenophobia of all kinds, and anti-migrant sentiment are on the rise, I’m excited to work with the Museum,” says Benjamin.

He was asked to join the museum’s Committee on Conscience, whose mandate is “to alert the national conscience, influence policy-makers, and stimulate worldwide action to confront and work to halt acts of genocide or related crimes against humanity,” according to the museum.

Retired President of the Supreme Court of Israel Talks About Social Justice

October 5, 2015

The Honorable Aharon Barak is the retired President of the Supreme Court of Israel. He has been described by Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan as "the judge or justice in my lifetime whom, I think, best represents and has best advanced the values of democracy and human rights, of the rule of law and of justice.”

Justice Barak discussed “Human Dignity: A Constitutional Value and Constitutional Right" in a lecture on September 28, 2015, hosted by the Dickey Center for International Understanding. He spoke as the Rabbi Marshall Meyer Great Issues Lecture on Social Justice at Dartmouth.

Justice Barak discussed the origins of the notion of human dignity, tracing the concept through classical antiquity, the great world religions and philosophy as well as its incorporation into modern constitutional law. He will also address a range of contemporary issues involving human dignity and questions of law.

View a video of his talk.

Dartmouth a Lead on Fulbright Arctic Program

October 22, 2014  Dartmouth Now

Professor Ross Virginia, Director of the Dickey Center's Institute of Arctic Studies, was selected by the U.S. State Department as one of two distinguished scholar leaders of the newly established Fulbright Arctic Initiative. His work focuses on climate change and the effect of rapid warming on the polar regions.

Virginia, the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, and Professor Michael Sfraga, a geographer and vice chancellor for university and student advancement from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, will take lead roles in the new Fulbright Arctic research program, which will fund interdisciplinary work for some 16 scholars from the eight countries that sit on the Arctic Council, an intergovernmental forum of the eight member states that border the Arctic Circle.

Trump Made A Mistake By Defending Saudi Arabia

November 21, 2018 |   NPR

Why Trump has continued His Defense Of Saudi Crown Prince

November 19, 2018  |  NPR.ORG

The Reason Why Right-Wing Terror Is Rising In America

October 19, 2018  |  TIME.COM

Is political rhetoric behind the suspect package attacks on Democrats?

October 25, 2019  |  BBC.CO.UK

Not his father's Saudi Arabia

17 Years after 9/11 people are finally forgetting about terrorism

September 12, 2018  |  POLITICO MAGAZINE

Seventeen years after the attacks on September 11th, Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin wrote a piece for Politico Magazine that notes the lack of recent attention to terrorism by our political leaders and the media and asks: "Is this a good thing? If so, is it durable?"

Consider this sign of the times: In late August, U.S. officials expressed confidence they had finally killed Ibrahim al-Asiri, the most fabled Al Qaeda bombmaker of the post-9/11 period. Asiri was reported to have created undetectable bombs and experimented with implanting them inside operatives’ bodies. He had been involved in the near-miss of the “Underwear Bomber” in 2009 and had nearly succeeded in killing former Saudi counterterrorism chief Muhammad bin Nayef. Asiri had haunted the sleep of counterterrorism officials, including me, for years.

Why the Vegas Shooter Did It

October 13, 2017  |  POLITICO MAGAZINE

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin writes in Politico Magazine on the speculation around why Stephen Paddock killed 58 people and wounded almost 500 in the worst mass killing in US history. What was his motive? Possibly simply fame, in an age when the Internet makes instant fame possible.

Paddock thus becomes the latest embodiment of a pattern that has emerged in recent decades. In a world gushing with information about fresh atrocities on the internet and social media, one where screaming chyrons and shouting talk radio hosts have become ubiquitous, a small number of individuals seek to make their mark through record-setting violence. By doing so, they hope to distinguish lives hitherto marked by insignificance or failure.

Read his article online

 

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