Faculty Research

"Week of the Arctic" Focused on the Way Forward

The “Week of the Arctic” in Fairbanks, Alaska, May 8-14, 2017, highlighted the United States as an Arctic nation and culminated in the historic handover of the Arctic Council Chairmanship from the U.S. to Finland. Opening the week, Dartmouth and the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) hosted a daylong workshop, sponsored by the Association of International Education Administrators (AIEA), to emphasize the importance of the Arctic in research and education exchanges. The launch of the second Fulbright Arctic Initiative program, once again co-led by Dartmouth and UAF, was also announced publicly for the first time.

Dartmouth’s Melody Brown Burkins, Ph.D., Associate Director for Programs and Research at the Dickey Center for International Understanding, welcomed workshop participants and spoke about how the Arctic offered opportunities for increased scientific collaboration and student mobility as well as engagement in global issues of policy and diplomacy.

Preparing for the Next Zika

April 29, 2016 

In the wake of the Ebola epidemic, governments have mobilized resources to support the development of vaccines and other biomedical countermeasures to emerging disease threats. Kendall Hoyt, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Geisel School of Medicine and Dickey Global Health Affiliated Faculty, has published an opinion piece in Nature Biotechnology about the need for effective governance structures to coordinate countermeasure development

Hoyt, and her co-author Richard Hatchett, Acting Director of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), argue that lessons from US biodefense programs can inform global efforts. 

IGERT Students Publish Research on Climate Change & Arctic Soils

EurekAlert AAAS  |  March 16, 2016

Warmer, wetter conditions in the Arctic are accelerating the loss of carbon stored in tundra and permafrost soils, creating a potential positive feedback that further boosts global temperatures, a Dartmouth College study finds.

CBS News Covers Dartmouth in Greenland

July 19, 2015

Greenland is ground zero for climate change research, and Dartmouth was there when a CBS Evening News crew flew from the US to Greenland to report on the rapid warming and melting taking place there.

Lauren Culler, an ecologist, and the postdoctoral fellow and outreach coordinator at the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center, was interviewed for producer T. Sean Herbert's Reporter's Notebook segment online about melt ponds near the Greenland Ice Sheet that are drying up. "Out of the 10 or so ponds that I have been keeping track of, about three of them have completely disappeared since 2012," said Culler. 

Scholars Announced for Inaugural Fulbright Arctic Initiative

US Department of State: Diplomacy in Action

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
April 21, 2015

Seventeen researchers from Arctic Council nations, including the United States, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, and Sweden will engage in collaborative thinking, analysis, problem-solving and multi-disciplinary research over the next 18 months as a part of the U.S. Department of State’s Fulbright Arctic Initiative. The diverse group of scholars will explore public-policy research questions and offer innovative solutions through a variety of disciplines ranging from geology and biology to law, sociology, global health, and art. See more information on the scholars, including their names and affiliations, here.

Dartmouth a Lead on Fulbright Arctic Program

October 22, 2014  Dartmouth Now

Professor Ross Virginia, Director of the Dickey Center's Institute of Arctic Studies, was selected by the U.S. State Department as one of two distinguished scholar leaders of the newly established Fulbright Arctic Initiative. His work focuses on climate change and the effect of rapid warming on the polar regions.

Virginia, the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, and Professor Michael Sfraga, a geographer and vice chancellor for university and student advancement from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, will take lead roles in the new Fulbright Arctic research program, which will fund interdisciplinary work for some 16 scholars from the eight countries that sit on the Arctic Council, an intergovernmental forum of the eight member states that border the Arctic Circle.

Fear Factor, Insect Growth and Climate Change

September 23, 2014 

Research published by Lauren Culler, a Postdoctoral Arctic Fellow at the Dickey Center's Institute of Arctic Studies, shows fear as well as warming temperatures may encourage insects to "eat more and grow faster." 

Culler tells Entomology Today, "In other words, it's less about temperature and more about the overall environmental conditions that shape the growth, survival, and distribution of insects." Culler was lead author of the study, published in the journal Oecologia

Read about her research at Entomology TodayNature World News, and Science Daily.

Getting policy right: why fisheries management is plagued by the panacea mindset

Aug 20, 2018 | Dartmouth Media Release

Getting policy right: why fisheries management is plagued by the panacea mindset

Fisheries management has often been characterized by regulatory policies that result in panaceas--broad-based policy solutions that are expected to address several problems, which result in unintended consequences. An international research team shows how one size fits all policies like individual transferable quotas may be doomed from the onset, as these policies perpetuate "the panacea mindset." The team calls for a more customized policy approach in a new piece that will be published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Dickey Center Faculty Grants Seed International Research Excellence

April 17, 2018

From pilot studies of clay-captured fingerprints to seed grants for a book about Nepalese culture and social change, the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding helps support between 20-25 faculty each year in their pursuit of early career and innovative research around the world.

Three Decades of Climate Research in Antarctica

August 26, 2017  |  Valley News

by Matt Hongoltz-Hetling

After the crew members tied the helicopter down to prevent it from blowing away in what was shaping up to be one of Antarctica’s famously powerful storms, they crawled over the frozen ground to join Dartmouth Professor Ross Virginia and a handful of students in the crowded emergency shelter.

They’d seen the storm on the horizon, a solid wall of clouds rushing toward them, and soon they felt it too — winds that slammed into the small aircraft and caused it to bounce erratically. Though they were just minutes from the relative safety of McMurdo Station on Ross Island, they had to abandon their plans and seek immediate shelter on the ground.

“It was a plywood shack with a little stove in it,” Virginia recalled. “There was a radio, and bunk beds. A little table. Nine of us jammed in there.”

Read the entire article at the Valley News

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