Faculty Research

Next of Kin: Seeing Extinction Through the Artist's Lens

May 2, 2017 |  Dartmouth Press Release  

Exhibition by Christina Seely with the Canary Project at the Harvard Museum of Natural History Through July 16, 2017.

Innovative Research Model for a Sustainable Arctic Future

December 15, 2016  |  Dartmouth Press Release

Fulbright Arctic Initiative Establishes Innovative Research Model for a Sustainable Arctic Future

Scholars From Arctic Nations Focus on Communities and Policy Relevant Research 

Dec. 15, 2016 – As the Arctic continues to experience climate change, resource development and globalization, the policy challenges that Arctic peoples face are many and extend beyond environmental protection and energy to issues of indigenous rights, health and wellness, governance and infrastructure. Seventeen inaugural Fulbright Arctic Initiative researchers and two co-lead scholars from all eight Arctic nations (Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the United States) tackled these Arctic issues through 18 months of research on energy, water, and health and infrastructure, and recently concluded their work with a week of public events in Washington, D.C.

NeAT Meeting on Polar Regions

November 11, 2016

Over 50 scientists from 10 different countries met at the Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies 15-16 November 2016 for the inaugural meeting of the Network for Arthropods of the Tundra (NeAT). NeAT is an international group focused on studying arthropods in Earth's rapidly changing polar regions. They hope to build collaborative capacity over two days of scientific presentations and discussions.

Keynote speakers included Jane Uhd Jepsen from the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research and Peter Convey from the British Antarctic Survey. These keynote speakers framed a meeting that explored arthropod science at both poles, including aquatic and terrestrial biodiversity, invasion ecology, ecosystem function, and responses to environmental change.

Fulbright Arctic Week 2016

STORIFY: Five days of science and policy

View Flickr pictures from the event

The seventeen Fulbright Arctic Initiative researchers and their co-lead scholars--Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies Ross Virginia and Vice Chancellor of the University of Alaska Mike Sfraga--will gather in Washington, D.C., October 24-26, 2016, to participate in policy meetings and public engagement events, including a capstone symposium showcasing the results of the Fulbright Arctic Scholars’ research and collaborations over the preceding 18 months.

The schedule for public and closed events is available at the Fulbright Arctic Week website. 

Antarctica Is Practically Defined by Ice. What Happens When It Melts?

October 13, 2016  

Ross Virginia, The Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science and Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies at Dartmouth, has co-authored an article in BioScience on the long-term effects of intense melting on the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica.

For prepared observers, a single season of melting offers clues to the future of the southern continent.

A single season of intense melting buffeted Antarctica in 2001-2002. It yielded changes that ranged from speeding up microbial food webs to shifting penguin populations. A special section in the October issue of BioScience examines the impacts on two very different Antarctic ecosystems.

Dickey Center Associate Director Leading Women in Science Policy

September 20, 2016  |  Amanda Skinner, School of Graduate and Advanced Studies

In late August, Dartmouth graduate alumna Melody Brown Burkins became the first woman to ever chair a U.S. delegation to the 35th International Geological Congress (IGC) hosted by the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) in Cape Town, South Africa. Not only was her leadership a first for the U.S. delegation to the IGC, but Burkins also worked with the U.S. National Academies (NAS) to assemble a first majority-female U.S. delegation to the IGC, appointing women geoscience leaders to six of the eight formal delegate positions. Prior to this 2016 meeting, U.S. IGC delegations had had, at most, two female delegates.

Arctic Mosquitoes Thriving Under Climate Change

Dartmouth Media contact: John Cramer | [email protected] | 603-646-9130

HANOVER, N.H. – Sept. 15, 2015 – Warming temperatures are causing Arctic mosquitoes to grow faster and emerge earlier, significantly boosting their population and threatening the caribou they feast on, a Dartmouth College study finds.

The study predicts the mosquitoes’ probability of surviving and emerging as adults will increase by more than 50 percent if Arctic temperatures rise 2 °C. The findings are important because changes in the timing and intensity of their emergence affect their role as pests of people and wildlife, as pollinators of tundra plants and as food for other species, including Arctic and migratory birds.

The researchers say the climate-population model they developed for Arctic mosquitoes and their predators can be generalized to any ecosystem where survival depends on sensitivities to changing temperatures.

Climate Change and Mosquitoes: Desperate and Hungry

“They’re aggressive because they’re desperate,” Lauren Culler, a postdoctoral fellow and outreach coordinator for the Institute of Arctic Studies, tells a journalist from Motherboard website about the mosquitoes swarming Greenland. “My research here has found that only 12-15 percent of mosquitoes ever get a blood meal." 

Culler has been studying the shallow ponds in Western Greenland where mosquitoes spend much of their lives to determine how the rapidly warming climate affects mosquitoes and caribou, as well as people.

Arctic Issues Are Global Issues

May 28, 2015

From May 17-21, 2015, Fulbright Canada hosted the inaugural meeting of the Fulbright Arctic Initiative in Iqaluit, Nunavut. Dartmouth environmental studies professor Ross Virginia, Co-lead for the Fulbright Arctic Initiative, and Melody Brown Burkins, Associate Director for Student Programs and Research at the Dickey Center, took part in the meetings. 

The Fulbright Arctic Initiative, launched in April in Ottawa, aims to stimulate international collaboration on Arctic issues by bringing together 17 scholars from the eight Arctic Council countries (Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the US). The researchers are meeting in Iqaluit to share their research and work on plans for future collaboration. 

Read the press release from Fulbright Canada and a story in The Arctic Journal.

Arctic Initiative Featured in Fulbright Finland Publication

The Fulbright Arctic Initiative, led by Professor Ross Virginia, Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center and the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, is featured in the Fulbright Center News published by the Fulbright Center Finland. Dartmouth has long-standing research collaborations with institutions in Finland, and the Institute of Arctic Studies has send undergraduates to the Arctic Centre at the University of Lapland on Stefansson Research Fellowships.

The current Fulbright Center News of Finland also contains an article by Dartmouth's Professor Matt Ayres about the importance of his stint as a Fulbright Graduate Student in 1985-87. He writes, "Ever since my own life changing experience as a Fulbright Fellow, nothing brings me more professional satisfaction than helping young scholars of today have similar opportunities for international exchange, and to gain the skills and international awareness that are so urgently needed in the 21st century."

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