Faculty Story

CBS News Covers Dartmouth in Greenland

July 19, 2015

Greenland is ground zero for climate change research, and Dartmouth was there when a CBS Evening News crew flew from the US to Greenland to report on the rapid warming and melting taking place there.

Lauren Culler, an ecologist, and the postdoctoral fellow and outreach coordinator at the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center, was interviewed for producer T. Sean Herbert's Reporter's Notebook segment online about melt ponds near the Greenland Ice Sheet that are drying up. "Out of the 10 or so ponds that I have been keeping track of, about three of them have completely disappeared since 2012," said Culler. 

Scholars Announced for Inaugural Fulbright Arctic Initiative

US Department of State: Diplomacy in Action

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
April 21, 2015

Seventeen researchers from Arctic Council nations, including the United States, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, and Sweden will engage in collaborative thinking, analysis, problem-solving and multi-disciplinary research over the next 18 months as a part of the U.S. Department of State’s Fulbright Arctic Initiative. The diverse group of scholars will explore public-policy research questions and offer innovative solutions through a variety of disciplines ranging from geology and biology to law, sociology, global health, and art. See more information on the scholars, including their names and affiliations, here.

How America Can Step Up Its Leadership Role in the Arctic

April 21, 2015  |  The National Interest

The United States takes over leadership of the Arctic Council, an eight-country forum for Arctic cooperation, starting April 24, 2015? In an editorial, co-authored by Ross A. Virginia, Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center and Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, with colleagues from University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Wilson Center and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC, the authors suggest that the complex geopolitical environment and tense atmosphere in Russian relations with the West should not impinge on future Arctic cooperation. 

"Arctic issues are beyond the scientific understanding and management capacity of any single country, and cooperation is essential in the face of enormous challenges there," the authors write. 

As U.S. Assumes Arctic Council Chairmanship, New Report Emphasizes Cooperation Over Conflict

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media contact: John Cramer | [email protected] | 603-646-9130

VIEW THE REPORT

As U.S. Assumes Arctic Council Chairmanship, New Report Emphasizes Cooperation Over Conflict

HANOVER, N.H. – April 20, 2015 – Although the media often portray the Arctic as a new “Great Game” ripe for conflict, a group of international Arctic experts co-chaired by Dartmouth College released recommendations today aimed at preserving the polar north as an area for political and military cooperation, sustainable development and scientific research.

Dartmouth a Lead on Fulbright Arctic Program

October 22, 2014  Dartmouth Now

Professor Ross Virginia, Director of the Dickey Center's Institute of Arctic Studies, was selected by the U.S. State Department as one of two distinguished scholar leaders of the newly established Fulbright Arctic Initiative. His work focuses on climate change and the effect of rapid warming on the polar regions.

Virginia, the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, and Professor Michael Sfraga, a geographer and vice chancellor for university and student advancement from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, will take lead roles in the new Fulbright Arctic research program, which will fund interdisciplinary work for some 16 scholars from the eight countries that sit on the Arctic Council, an intergovernmental forum of the eight member states that border the Arctic Circle.

Combatting Tuberculosis in Tanzania

January 15, 2019 |  GEISEL NEWS

America must act on the North and South poles

September 13, 2018

The Institute of Arctic Studies Director Ross Virginia has co-authored a piece in The National Interest with former Dickey Director Kenneth Yalowitz and former Ambassador for Oceans and Fisheries (Department of State) David Balton. In the article they call for greater U.S. leadership in the polar regions. Read it here.

 

 

17 Years after 9/11 people are finally forgetting about terrorism

September 12, 2018  |  POLITICO MAGAZINE

Seventeen years after the attacks on September 11th, Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin wrote a piece for Politico Magazine that notes the lack of recent attention to terrorism by our political leaders and the media and asks: "Is this a good thing? If so, is it durable?"

Consider this sign of the times: In late August, U.S. officials expressed confidence they had finally killed Ibrahim al-Asiri, the most fabled Al Qaeda bombmaker of the post-9/11 period. Asiri was reported to have created undetectable bombs and experimented with implanting them inside operatives’ bodies. He had been involved in the near-miss of the “Underwear Bomber” in 2009 and had nearly succeeded in killing former Saudi counterterrorism chief Muhammad bin Nayef. Asiri had haunted the sleep of counterterrorism officials, including me, for years.

Dickey Center Faculty Grants Seed International Research Excellence

April 17, 2018

From pilot studies of clay-captured fingerprints to seed grants for a book about Nepalese culture and social change, the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding helps support between 20-25 faculty each year in their pursuit of early career and innovative research around the world.

Why climate change is worsening public health problems

January 25, 2018  |  The Conversation

The Dickey Center's Global Health Initiative Program Manager Anne Sosin and Dartmouth Assistant Professor of Anthropology Chelsey Kivland published an article in "The Conversation" online about the effects of climate change on public health worldwide. 

“We believe that leaders must recognize that environmental policy is health policy. Rollbacks of environmental regulations will cause far greater consequences on health, in the U.S. and globally, than any health care bill.”

They describe the burden of climate change on communities in Haiti and Puerto Rico in particular. 

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