Fellowship

CBS News Covers Dartmouth in Greenland

July 19, 2015

Greenland is ground zero for climate change research, and Dartmouth was there when a CBS Evening News crew flew from the US to Greenland to report on the rapid warming and melting taking place there.

Lauren Culler, an ecologist, and the postdoctoral fellow and outreach coordinator at the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center, was interviewed for producer T. Sean Herbert's Reporter's Notebook segment online about melt ponds near the Greenland Ice Sheet that are drying up. "Out of the 10 or so ponds that I have been keeping track of, about three of them have completely disappeared since 2012," said Culler. 

Rhodes Scholar is Lombard Public Service Fellow

Miriam Jerotich Kilimo ’14 of Nairobi, Kenya, has been named a Rhodes Scholar for 2015—the 76th Rhodes Scholar in Dartmouth’s history. Miriam was awarded a Lombard Public Service Fellowship this year by the Dickey Center and the Tucker Foundation for work with the Africa Coordinating Center for the Abandonment of Female Genital Mutilation (ACCAF). She is currently based at the University of Nairobi in Kenya. She is supporting the organization's efforts to sensitive different communities about the health and socio-economic effects associated with the practice. She is also involved in creating and equipping a resource center focused on compiling research and literature on female circumcision as it is practiced continent-wide.

The Effects of Off-shore Drilling on Barrow, Alaska

by Michael Berger '14, Stefansson Research Fellowship, Barrow, Alaska

My research focused on how the Barrow, Alaska community could stand to benefit from offshore oil drilling that could happen over the next several decades. I looked at how political and corporate institutions such as the North Slope Borough and the Arctic Slope
Regional Corporation are acting as players in securing benefits from the drilling.

I had to first understand the cultural and political framework and history of oil in the North Slope, including understanding the Inupiat people. This type of social science research is incredibly self-driven. There was no one telling me where to go, whom to talk to, which leads to follow and which to let drop.

Among other things, my time in Barrow allowed me to consider the role of the social scientist. In a world where knowledge is both temporally and spatially distributed, the role of the social scientist is not to generate new knowledge, but instead to learn from a situation in one place and time and share it in a different place and time period, and to find patterns or similarities between situations across both space and time.

Lessons from the Iraq War

January 7, 2019   |  WASHINGTONPOST.COM

China's Political Economy After 40 Years of Reform

International Security Postdoctoral Fellowship Program

December 18, 2018

Just a reminder that the Dickey Center & Dean of the Faculty's U.S. Foreign Policy and International Security Postdoctoral Fellowship program is accepting applications until January 2nd for the 2019-2020 academic year. Apply now!

For more information, click here.

Jake Sullivan, Magro Family Distinguished Fellow in International Affairs

November 25, 2018

Dickey Center Faculty Grants Seed International Research Excellence

April 17, 2018

From pilot studies of clay-captured fingerprints to seed grants for a book about Nepalese culture and social change, the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding helps support between 20-25 faculty each year in their pursuit of early career and innovative research around the world.

Dickey Center Fellow Receives Prestigious Research Award from the Government of Canada

We are extremely pleased to announce that Leah Sarson, postdoctoral research associate in the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth and Visiting Arctic Fellow in the Institute of Arctic Studies, was recently chosen to receive a prestigious Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) fellowship from the Government of Canada, an award given to the “most promising Canadian new scholars in the social sciences and humanities.”

Sarson will use her award to continue her postdoctoral work at Dartmouth with Melody Brown Burkins, Adjunct Professor of Environmental Studies and Associate Director for Programs and Research at the Dickey Center, Ross Virginia, Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science and Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies, and several other Dartmouth colleagues.

The Feud that Sank Saigon

March 3, 2017  |  The New York Times

In a New York Times op-ed, U.S. Foreign Policy and International Security Postdoctoral Fellow Sean Fear explains the showdown between two rival generals -- Nguyen Cao Ky and Nguyen Van Thieu -- that ended the hope of democratic stability in South Vietnam.

Both men were young and ambitious, and both were shrewd navigators of the internecine schemes and coups plaguing South Vietnam’s ruling military. And after years of jousting and coalition building, they were headed for a confrontation in South Vietnam’s 1967 presidential election. At stake was the political legitimacy of the South Vietnamese state itself, critical to turning the tide in the protracted struggle against the Communists.

Read the entire op-ed. 

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