Fellowship

Lombard Public Service Fellowship Blogs

Read the blogs created by alumni who have worked around the world from Switzerland to Kenya as Richard Lombard Public Service Fellowship recipients. 

The Richard Lombard Public Service Fellowship was established 25 years ago by family and friends in memory of Richard Lombard, a 1953 Dartmouth alumni and former Trustee of Dartmouth College. The fellowship is aimed at providing grants to “encourage and enable Dartmouth alumni to use their education to make a significant positive impact on society.”

For more information about the Lombard Fellowship, visit the Dickey website

 

 

Gone South for the Winter -- to Antarctica

February 17, 2015  |  Dartmouth Now by Joseph Blumberg

Dartmouth undergraduate Diana Wise ’15 spent two weeks of her winter break in the dramatic domain of Antarctica, an experience she captured in a blog, “Gone South For the Winter,” which she filed from the field.

“Diana participated in the field portion of a multi-university Antarctica study abroad program that Environmental Studies and the Institute of Arctic Studies are supporting this year for the first time,” says Lee McDavid, the program manager at the Institute of Arctic Studies at the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding. “Diana is the first student to enroll in this program, a unique opportunity, given that most students conducting field work in Antarctica tend to be graduate students.”

Helping Peru Prepare for an Emergency

by Kelsey Wheeler '14

Global Health Initiative Fellowship, Peru, Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia

All eyes were focused on the twenty-year-old Dartmouth student in the front of the room. Bridget Golob '14 looked back at the sea of unfamiliar faces and began presenting in their native language: Spanish. Her mentor, Dr. Raul Acosta, E.R. Chief at Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia, looked on quietly from the back. He had done much to prepare Bridget for this day, connecting her to resources throughout the city of Lima, Peru, and offering advice. But today, his primary contribution was driving Bridget into one of the city’s slums, Villa Maria del Triunfo, to present her work on emergency disaster preparedness to community members.

Weeks earlier, Bridget had arrived in Lima eager to begin the off-term experience she had been offered through the Dickey Center’s Global Health Initiative (GHI) Fellowship program and The Dartmouth Center for Healthcare Delivery (TDC), one of many on and off campus opportunities offered through the Dickey Center.

Dickey Center Alumni Win Rhodes and Stamps Awards

Two alumni of Dickey Center programs have received prestigious awards. Colin Walmsley ’15 has received Dartmouth’s 78th Rhodes Scholar and Leehi Yona '16 has received a Stamps Leadership Scholarship. Both students have participated in the Dickey Center's Great Issues Scholars program for first-year students. Walmsley was also a War & Peace Scholar at the Dickey Center. Yona is currently an Arctic Intern at the Dickey Center's Institute of Arctic Studies.

Liberian YALI Fellow Returns to Campus

The Dickey Center welcomes back to campus Patrice Juah, a recent Liberian Fellow in President Obama's Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI). She will be speaking at a student-only event sponsored by the Dickey Center's student health organization, the Dartmouth Coalition for Global Health, about the Ebola crisis and the anti-stigma campaign she and the Arterial Network, a Pan-African network of artists, activists, and others, recently launched called "Ebola Is Not My Identity."

Juah has a busy schedule this week. She will be meeting with many Dartmouth YALI program partners and with Dartmouth's Emergency Planning Group, which is outlining policies and actions for addressing a response to potential Ebola threats on campus. Juah has been away from Liberia for 26 days and has cleared the monitoring period. In addition, she's being interviewed by the Standpoints student global health magazine and meeting with various faculty.

She also will be giving a talk at FH Clothing in Quechee, VT, on Friday, November 21 at 3pm that is open to the public.

Alden Adolph, Ph.D. Student

Engineering Sciences

Alden is studying how the Greenland Ice Sheet keeps records of historical atmospheric composition in the tiny bubbles of air trapped within the ice.

She focuses on understanding how the gases in the atmosphere travel through the snow and firn (snow that is more than one year old) so that we know how long the air has been trapped within the ice.

In 2007, Alden and her colleagues collected a firn core from Summit Station on the Greenland Ice Sheet and have since been studying how gas travels through the firn. The first step has been determining the best method to measure gas transport, which is important for correctly reconstructing the history of atmospheric composition and relating that to past temperature.

Once Alden and her colleagues understand the way that the earth has behaved in the past, they can hopefully improve predictions about what might happen with regards to future changes in the atmosphere, as well as the implications for the Greenland Ice Sheet, ecosystems, and people.

Kayaking Siberia's Lake Baikal to Evaluate the Effect of Climate Change

by Anna Gleizer ‘14, Stefansson Research Fellowship, Lake Baikal, Russia

During summer 2012, I became the youngest woman to kayak the circumference of Siberia’s Lake Baikal. The journey through Russia and into eastern Siberia took two weeks and the circumnavigation itself lasted 45 days, during which I collected hydrology data for an independent research project aimed at evaluating the effect of global climate change and localized anthropomorphic pollution on the quality of Baikal water.

Fieldwork in Denali National Park

by Sam Streeter '13, TH '14

Watch Sam's video about his work

During the spring-summer 2013 interim and continuing through the summer 2013 term, I performed research in the Dartmouth College Earth Sciences (EARS) Department as an engineering senior honors thesis student, Stefansson Research Fellow, and John Lindsley Fund grant recipient. The first portion of my experience involved fieldwork on the Kahiltna Glacier in the Alaska Range in Denali National Park, Alaska, and the second portion was laboratory-based in the Dartmouth EARS Department.

My research experience involved fieldwork with Professor Erich Osterberg and his team on the Kahiltna Glacier in Denali National Park. At the Kahiltna Glacier basecamp, I helped transport from the field all ice cores drilled on the slopes of nearby Mt. Hunter, helped setup a remote weather station on the Kahiltna Glacier, and helped organize, collapse, and transport research team supplies from the field.

Reflections on Being a War and Peace Fellow

by Utkarsh Agarwal ’13, War and Peace Fellow

I was admitted into the War and Fellows Program in 2010 as a sophomore, and returned as a fellow for my junior and senior years. In my four years at Dartmouth, the W&P Fellows program has been one of the most insightful and exciting opportunities where I got to interact and learn from my peers just as much as I learnt from the guest speakers. As an engineering major at Dartmouth, the W&P Fellows Program allowed me to pursue my passion of international affairs without the burden of readings or homework.

Throughout the year, W&P Fellows get unfettered access to a long list of well-accomplished people including ex-ambassadors, war veterans, CIA analysts, activists and journalists who visit campus to give public talks. Fellows get the opportunity to speak to these guests in a candid, off-the-record, dinner setting. The W&P Fellows program is also self-driven in the sense that any Fellow can request to bring in a guest speaker to campus, and Dickey will fund their visit.

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