From the Field

Working with the Kosovo Women's Network

“Some people ask: ‘Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights, or something like that?’ Because that would be dishonest. Feminism is, of course, part of human rights in general—but to choose to use the vague expression human rights is to deny the specific and particular problem of gender. It would be a way of pretending that it was not women who have, for centuries, been excluded. It would be a way of denying that the problem of gender targets women.”
—Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, We Should All Be Feminists

Antonia Hoidal ’16 completed a Global Health Internship at the Kosovo Women’s Network in Pristina, Kosovo, during the Summer of 2015.

Walking along Pristina’s Mother Theresa Boulevard at night I am always in awe of the fabulously dressed women of Kosovo. Effortlessly gliding in 3-inch heels, they saunter along the boulevard singing melodies in Albanian, while in the background, the “Ezan”—the Muslim call to prayer—echoes across the city hills.

Rhodes Scholar is Lombard Public Service Fellow

Miriam Jerotich Kilimo ’14 of Nairobi, Kenya, has been named a Rhodes Scholar for 2015—the 76th Rhodes Scholar in Dartmouth’s history. Miriam was awarded a Lombard Public Service Fellowship this year by the Dickey Center and the Tucker Foundation for work with the Africa Coordinating Center for the Abandonment of Female Genital Mutilation (ACCAF). She is currently based at the University of Nairobi in Kenya. She is supporting the organization's efforts to sensitive different communities about the health and socio-economic effects associated with the practice. She is also involved in creating and equipping a resource center focused on compiling research and literature on female circumcision as it is practiced continent-wide.

The Effects of Off-shore Drilling on Barrow, Alaska

by Michael Berger '14, Stefansson Research Fellowship, Barrow, Alaska

My research focused on how the Barrow, Alaska community could stand to benefit from offshore oil drilling that could happen over the next several decades. I looked at how political and corporate institutions such as the North Slope Borough and the Arctic Slope
Regional Corporation are acting as players in securing benefits from the drilling.

I had to first understand the cultural and political framework and history of oil in the North Slope, including understanding the Inupiat people. This type of social science research is incredibly self-driven. There was no one telling me where to go, whom to talk to, which leads to follow and which to let drop.

Among other things, my time in Barrow allowed me to consider the role of the social scientist. In a world where knowledge is both temporally and spatially distributed, the role of the social scientist is not to generate new knowledge, but instead to learn from a situation in one place and time and share it in a different place and time period, and to find patterns or similarities between situations across both space and time.

The Life Aquatic

By Ava Hill ‘22

When I signed up to boat around northern Canada to do archaeology for nearly two months, I had no idea what I was getting myself into. I imagined a picturesque, adventure-filled summer, like something out of a Wes Anderson movie. Turns out that, visually, I wasn’t far off. The colorful houses and boats of coastal northern canada, along with the icebergs and arctic birds, made for great cinematography. As we drove up towards Lushes Bight, Newfoundland, where our boat the Pitsuilak was docked, I felt romanticization of the region creeping in. Even now, the beauty of the physical landscape makes it hard not to look back on the trip without rose-colored glasses. I soon saw that northern Canada is so much more than the postcards, although itinerant icebergs, whales, and puffins were abundant.

Ali Prevost-Reilly reflects on her term abroad in Greenland

By Ali Prevost-Reilly, Dartmouth '21
Ilisimatusarfik, the University of Greenland Exchange Student, 2018

 

Greenland

November 2, 2018

Check out this fantastic video and story on the Dartmouth Institute of Arctic Studies' amazing work in Greenland. Faculty working with students, demonstrating what's great about a Dartmouth education.

Matthew Magann ’21 – Rebuilding Refugee Communities

During the summer of 2018, Matthew worked as a communications intern for the Collateral Repair Project (CRP), an NGO serving refugees in Amman, Jordan. CRP offers direct assistance to refugees, but much of its work centers around rebuilding communities. Matthew had a variety of responsibilities including; interviewing people at CRP’s community center, writing articles and blogposts, maintaining a social media presence and teaching an English class.

By Matthew Magann ’21 Class of ’66 Named Intern

Edward Kamuhanda ’21 - Assessing STEM-Readiness

Over the Summer of 2018, Edward Kamuhanda '21 interned at Interchange Learning Ltd in Kigali, Rwanda. In this position, he conducted field research with schools around the country about their STEM-readiness. Compiling his findings, he wrote recommendations for improving their capacity to meet the new demands of the national curriculum. Edward is currently a sophomore majoring in engineering. He is also an active member of the Global Village Living Learning Community. This internship experience has opened Edwards eyes to tech consulting, a field he is interested in gaining more experience in. 

By Edward Kamuhanda ’21 Class of ’60 Named Intern

During my freshman year summer, I interned at Interchange Learning Ltd in Kigali, Rwanda. This is a youth-led platform that promotes innovation and entrepreneurship. During this incredible experience, I conducted market research to understand the current laboratory infrastructure in STEM education in secondary schools and college programs in Rwanda. I then offered recommendations for improving the practical learning experience in STEM courses in Rwanda. 

Kingsley Osei-Karikari ’19 - Building an Electronic Medical Record System in Ghana

In the Fall of 2017, Kingsley set upon the task of building an electronic medical record system for the Brain Clinic and other mental health hospitals in Ghana. Going into the internship, Kingsley’s research idea was to conduct a statistical analysis at the Brain Clinic and other mental health centers while also learning and observing about the diagnosis and treatment of mental illnesses in various regions of Ghana. However, once arriving and talking with colleagues, Kingsley decided that the best way to maximize his time would be to build an electronic medical record system.

By Kingsley Osei-Karikari ’19 Class of ’54 Named Intern

My time in Ghana was revealing, rewarding, and challenging: revealing because I was on a personal journey of self-discovery and awareness; rewarding because I appreciated both the successes I enjoyed and the failures I encountered as invaluable experiences in my professional development; challenging because I had to adapt my initial research ideas from a more backward-looking undertaking to a more forward-looking initiative.

Building Access to Clean Drinking Water

During the summer of 2017, David Ouma '20 interned with Jibu Company in Uganda, Rwanda, and Kenya. Jibu is a company that builds a network of locally owned franchises that enhance access to clean drinking water within communities. David worked with the corporate and engineering/tech teams.

by David Ouma ’20, Class of 1966 Named Intern

I spent the first part of my internship in Kampala, Uganda, where Jibu Company is quite established and has a big market presence. While there I was trained by the in-country Jibu engineer on the ultra-filtration equipment used by the franchises. During the training, I spent a considerable amount of time studying the water purification process, the chemicals used and how to assemble a model of the machine they were using.

While in Kampala, the company housed me and I lived with another employee, an American who would become a friend and a guide as I traversed the city. The company was using a franchise business model—all the equipment was owned by the corporate company—so they had to run maintenance.

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