From the Field

Working with the Kosovo Women's Network

“Some people ask: ‘Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights, or something like that?’ Because that would be dishonest. Feminism is, of course, part of human rights in general—but to choose to use the vague expression human rights is to deny the specific and particular problem of gender. It would be a way of pretending that it was not women who have, for centuries, been excluded. It would be a way of denying that the problem of gender targets women.”
—Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, We Should All Be Feminists

Antonia Hoidal ’16 completed a Global Health Internship at the Kosovo Women’s Network in Pristina, Kosovo, during the Summer of 2015.

Walking along Pristina’s Mother Theresa Boulevard at night I am always in awe of the fabulously dressed women of Kosovo. Effortlessly gliding in 3-inch heels, they saunter along the boulevard singing melodies in Albanian, while in the background, the “Ezan”—the Muslim call to prayer—echoes across the city hills.

Rhodes Scholar is Lombard Public Service Fellow

Miriam Jerotich Kilimo ’14 of Nairobi, Kenya, has been named a Rhodes Scholar for 2015—the 76th Rhodes Scholar in Dartmouth’s history. Miriam was awarded a Lombard Public Service Fellowship this year by the Dickey Center and the Tucker Foundation for work with the Africa Coordinating Center for the Abandonment of Female Genital Mutilation (ACCAF). She is currently based at the University of Nairobi in Kenya. She is supporting the organization's efforts to sensitive different communities about the health and socio-economic effects associated with the practice. She is also involved in creating and equipping a resource center focused on compiling research and literature on female circumcision as it is practiced continent-wide.

The Effects of Off-shore Drilling on Barrow, Alaska

by Michael Berger '14, Stefansson Research Fellowship, Barrow, Alaska

My research focused on how the Barrow, Alaska community could stand to benefit from offshore oil drilling that could happen over the next several decades. I looked at how political and corporate institutions such as the North Slope Borough and the Arctic Slope
Regional Corporation are acting as players in securing benefits from the drilling.

I had to first understand the cultural and political framework and history of oil in the North Slope, including understanding the Inupiat people. This type of social science research is incredibly self-driven. There was no one telling me where to go, whom to talk to, which leads to follow and which to let drop.

Among other things, my time in Barrow allowed me to consider the role of the social scientist. In a world where knowledge is both temporally and spatially distributed, the role of the social scientist is not to generate new knowledge, but instead to learn from a situation in one place and time and share it in a different place and time period, and to find patterns or similarities between situations across both space and time.

Believing in the Power of People

by Milan Chuttani ’18

During the fall of 2016, Milan Chuttani '18 interned with the International Rescue Committee in Baltimore, Maryland. Names have been modified to preserve the anonymity of IRC clients.

I have always been passionate in making people feel welcome in communities I care about. As a student of international relations, I am also fascinated by the consequences of wars, politics, and rivalries between world powers. Interning with the Asylee Case Management team at the International Rescue Committee resettlement office in Baltimore provided me the unique ability to combine both of these interests, to work with people fleeing war and persecution from around the world, and to welcome them into their new American communities.

Poisonous Snakes and Earthquakes: Conservation in Costa Rica

by Victoria Chi '17

During the spring of 2017, Alexander Cotnoir ’19 interned in Costa Rica at Osa Conservation, an organization that works to protect the biodiversity of Osa Peninsula.

When students engage in internships abroad, they often have to adapt to new and unexpected work environments. Few students, however, have to brave thunderstorms and earthquakes, poisonous snakes and insects, and toxic plants. Environmental Studies major Alexander Cotnoir ’19 confronted all of these obstacles, fearlessly and even with excitement, during his internship in the spring of 2017.

Emergency Preparedness in Peru

During the summer of 2016, Jade McLaughlin ’17 and Madellena Thornton ’17 worked as Global Health Initiative interns at Hospital Cayetano Heredia (HCH) in Lima, Peru. Their work on emergency preparedness focused on the willingness of healthcare workers to respond in a disaster.

by Madellena Thornton ‘17

The eight districts in Northern Lima stricken by poverty are incredibly vulnerable to devastation from a natural or biological disaster due to the lack of first-response services, potentially collapsible and densely clustered housing, and enormous education and income disparities. Hospital Cayetano Heredia (HCH), a general level III-1 hospital, constitutes one of three hospitals in the Ministry of Health in Northern Lima. Among the three hospitals, there are fewer than 900 beds. With a population of 2.75 million people, these hospitals together have insufficient capacity for healthcare, overwhelmed emergency services, and large gaps in disaster risk management for the population that they serve.

The CDC and an Interconnected World

Victoria Chi ‘17

When we think about the mission of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)—to protect the health of Americans—we often think about addressing domestic health issues, or about coordinating emergency responses to global disease epidemics. Both of these are so vitally important. Yet in this increasingly interconnected world, equally important is the need to improve the health and well-being of people in countries across the globe, and to steadily build the public health capacity of all nations to respond to disease threats.

Over winter term 2016, I worked as an intern in the policy office of the Center for Global Health within the CDC. Throughout this internship, I watched and learned from the people who are working every day to ensure that all people have access to the most fundamental of human rights: the right to good health. I was exposed to the myriad programs and initiatives that exist to improve the health of populations and to strengthen health care systems, and I recognized that bolstering the health and capacity of countries abroad makes the entire world safer from the spread of disease.

Students Attend Matariki Global Citizenship Meeting

A group of 27 faculty and students from six partner institutions in the Matariki Network of Universities (MNU) came together for a multi-institutional, faculty-student workshop in Uppsala, Sweden, April 18-21, 2016. It was the first meeting of the Global Citizenship Programme. The Dartmouth delegation included Dickey Center Associate Director for Programs and Research and Adjunct Professor, Melody Brown Burkins (PhD ’98), Victor Cabrera ’19, and Freya Jamison ’17 as well as Assistant Provost Laurel Stavis and Research Professor Ron Edsforth.

The event focused on developing the future of the new Global Citizenship Programme, which aims to set up substantial links and projects around global citizenship between and within partner universities. The programme can cover both education and research, along with outreach activities, but it initially is focused on the following strands:

Polar Passion

February 2016

The Dartmouth Engineering Magazine this month has a story about Thayer PhD graduate student Alden Adolph, who accompanied fifteen high school students to Greenland last summer with the Joint Science Education Project (JSEP), funded by the National Science Foundation. JSEP is run jointly by the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center for International Understanding and the Government of Greenland. The students are from the US, Greenland and Denmark.

Adolph was accompanied by Thayer PhD candidate Amber Whelsky and Lauren Culler, Co-PI of JSEP and a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute of Arctic Studies. Adolph and Culler were students in the Polar Environmental Change IGERT. 

#JASE16 in Antarctica

The Joint Antarctic Science Expedition has landed after traveling from Miami to Santiago to Punta Arenas, Chile,...to Antarctica.

Follow their continuing adventures!

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