From the Field

Gone South for the Winter -- to Antarctica

February 17, 2015  |  Dartmouth Now by Joseph Blumberg

Dartmouth undergraduate Diana Wise ’15 spent two weeks of her winter break in the dramatic domain of Antarctica, an experience she captured in a blog, “Gone South For the Winter,” which she filed from the field.

“Diana participated in the field portion of a multi-university Antarctica study abroad program that Environmental Studies and the Institute of Arctic Studies are supporting this year for the first time,” says Lee McDavid, the program manager at the Institute of Arctic Studies at the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding. “Diana is the first student to enroll in this program, a unique opportunity, given that most students conducting field work in Antarctica tend to be graduate students.”

Helping Peru Prepare for an Emergency

by Kelsey Wheeler '14

Global Health Initiative Fellowship, Peru, Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia

All eyes were focused on the twenty-year-old Dartmouth student in the front of the room. Bridget Golob '14 looked back at the sea of unfamiliar faces and began presenting in their native language: Spanish. Her mentor, Dr. Raul Acosta, E.R. Chief at Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia, looked on quietly from the back. He had done much to prepare Bridget for this day, connecting her to resources throughout the city of Lima, Peru, and offering advice. But today, his primary contribution was driving Bridget into one of the city’s slums, Villa Maria del Triunfo, to present her work on emergency disaster preparedness to community members.

Weeks earlier, Bridget had arrived in Lima eager to begin the off-term experience she had been offered through the Dickey Center’s Global Health Initiative (GHI) Fellowship program and The Dartmouth Center for Healthcare Delivery (TDC), one of many on and off campus opportunities offered through the Dickey Center.

Working with VOICE 4 Girls in India

Eliana Piper ’14 and Rachel Funk '14

VOICE 4 Girls, Hyderabad, India

Eliana Piper ’14 and Rachel Funk ’14 both did internships with VOICE 4 Girls, a nonprofit based in Hyderabad, India, that equips girls to take charge of their futures by teaching marginalized girls general life skills, basic health and safety knowledge, and spoken English. The camps are fun and girl-focused and give campers tools to break cycles of social and economic inequality.

Eliana says the field work she did and the skills she learned will be extremely beneficial in her long term plans to do international gender development work. She found VOICE 4 Girls to be one of the most valuable experiences of her college career. She hopes to return to India to work again in some capacity. 

A Team Effort in Tanzania

Fall 2014 | Dartmouth Medicine

Read about the experience of Tanzanian Issac Maro, MD, MPH ('09) in the DarDar medical student exchange program at the Geisel Medical School. Maro worked with Ford von Reyn, MD, director of the DarDar Health Study and associate director Richard Waddell, MD. He also collaborated with Lisa Adams, MD, associate dean for global health and director of the Dickey Center's Global Health Initiative, to create a pediatric HIV clinic that serves children in Dar es Salaam.

Read the entire story in Dartmouth Medicine

A New Global Health Partnership in Vietnam

The Dickey Center’s Global Health Initiative has been actively developing a rich portfolio of partnerships with the twin aims of expanding student engagement and research collaboration. This summer GHI Program Manager, Jessica Friedman, journeyed to Hanoi, Vietnam to meet partners at Population Health and Development (PHAD) to conduct a site assessment and experience first-hand the impact of the research studies three students had been working on that summer.

PHAD has been a research collaborator with Dartmouth-Hitchcock’s Joseph Rosen, MD and UCLA’s Peter Katona, MD working on a mobile disease surveillance system. The system has been designed to report live epidemiological data of specific infectious diseases, as collected by commune health centers, through a text messaging system. Based on Dartmouth’s ongoing collaborative work with PHAD, program managers at both institutions quickly identified two studies for students work on over the summer of 2014: the mMOM project on child maternal health and a mental health project.

Looking Back: Dartmouth Seniors Reflect on Transformational Dickey Center Experiences

by Alexander A. Lopez '15

Photo: Evan Diamond ’13, Mahmud Johnson ’13, Lars Blackmore

As Dartmouth says goodbye to the Class of 2013, the Dickey Center asked seniors to reflect on the global learning that informed their passions, interests, and career paths. The following stories represent a sampling of the many amazing undergraduates that the Dickey Center has worked with over the past four years.

Evan Diamond '13:  Transforming Education and the Environment through Art 

Evan Diamond '13 knew he wanted to attend Dartmouth in the second grade. An avid ski-racer, growing up in Connecticut, Diamond described skiing at Dartmouth as “the dream.” Diamond’s dream became a reality when he was recruited to the Dartmouth ski team after rigorous preparations undergone at his private boarding school in Vermont.

Competitive skiing enabled Diamond to travel around the world, from Argentina to Chile, and throughout much of Europe. After two years, however, Diamond became injured and was unable to ski his junior season.

A Perfect Stepping Stone to International Economic Development

Todor Plamenov Parushev ’14
International Internship, Chile

Todor Plamenov Parushev ’14 completed an internship with the Natural Resources and Infrastructure Division of the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (UN-ECLAC) in Santiago, Chile. The UN-ECALC is a part of the UN Economic and Social Council that works in the areas of economic and social development, executing independent economic research, providing advisory services to governments, and other support activities towards public policy pre-shaping.

Todor’s internship focused on the field of infrastructural development, and specifically on how public policies on logistics and mobility are conceived, designed, implemented and controlled. The team that Todor worked with focused on resolving problems of transportation and logistics supply and demand by mathematical modeling, exploratory data analysis and predictive analytics of transportation data.

Improving Water Access in South Africa

by Georgi Klissurki '14, ThinkImpact, South Africa

My summer in South Africa working with ThinkImpact helping villagers find ways to improve water access has had and will continue to have an extremely strong impact on my life. Academically, I realized how well my two majors, engineering and economics, combine in real life, and particularly in entrepreneurship. In addition, I found great value in design thinking, an approach to innovation that integrates numerous disciplines and emphasizes empathy through utilizing the so-called human-centered design method.

I have serious post-graduation plans to work as an entrepreneur aiming to create positive social impact. Immediately after Dartmouth, I will continue gathering professional experience working in anti-trust economic consulting in New York City. After two or three years, I plan on attending graduate or professional school, if I feel that I can grow significantly there.

Following those years, I intend to return to my home country, Bulgaria, to start a career at the intersection of entrepreneurship and government.

How Temperature Change Affects the Greenland Ice Sheet

Gifford Wong, Ph.D. Student, Earth Sciences

Gifford Wong looks at the effect of climate change on the growth and decay of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS). He studies how changes in temperature affect our ability to assess the health of the GIS.

During the summers of 2010 and 2011, Gifford collected snow samples from pits (~2 m depth) and cores (~10-100 m depth) in the northwest GIS along a traverse route that roughly connects Thule Air Base with NEEM camp and Summit Station in Greenland. He took these samples back to the labs at Dartmouth where he prepared them for chemical analyses.

So far, Gifford has characterized how snow pit chemistry in the dry snow zone of the GIS is affected by percolating melt water. He also observed how the rate of change in snow accumulation is different between more coastal sites than it is in the interior of the GIS. This observation may improve our ability to model glacier mass changes with our changing climate.

The Yeti Robot Looks for Dangerous Crevasses

Rebecca Williams, PhD, Engineering

Rebecca William’s research while she was a Thayer School of Engineering graduate student involved creating higher-level intelligence and control software for a four-wheel robot called Yeti. It pulls ground penetrating radar behind it to find crevasses. Each year heavy equipment resupply missions travel to remote, heavily crevassed locations in Greenland and Antarctica. Rebecca worked on the Yeti robot that tows Ground Penetration Radar to detect crevasses.

In 2012, she also worked on Roosevelt Island on the eastern side of the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica in an 8-nation project to reconstruct the climatic and glaciological history of the Ross Sea region since the last ice age. The eastern side of the embayment is the missing link in understanding how this critical region has responded to climate changes in the past, and a more detailed understanding of the climate changes and associated ice behavior will enhance our ability to inform projections of sea level rise into the coming centuries.

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