From the Field

Expanding Education in Nepal

by Wouther Zwart '14, International Internship, VillageTech Solutions, Nepal

I spent four wonderful months in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, with a small NGO called VillageTech Solutions. Their education project is an audio-visual teaching aid, which is aimed to improve both the method of teaching as well as to augment the teaching material available to Nepalese public schools.

During my time in Nepal, I collaborated with Nepalese universities, local start-ups, open source groups and companies to finalize the development of the project and to build a community of students, engineers and entrepreneurs in order to expand education methods in public schools.

How Not to Get Eaten by Polar Bears

May 8, 2014

A two-day polar safety training sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the Earth Sciences Department, and the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center focused on staying safe and responding to emergencies, including encountering, or avoiding, polar bears.

Canadian bear expert Andy McMullen spent a day with two dozen Dartmouth graduate and undergraduate students and faculty who's research takes them into Greenland, Alaska, Canada and elsewhere.

Erich Osterberg, an assistant professor in Dartmouth’s Department of Earth Sciences, says global climate change is affecting the way research is conducted. “Not all of changing field conditions that scientists face make their job easier. In Greenland, some Dartmouth scientists now carry rifles and hire guards for polar bear protection in areas where the bears were rare until a few years ago.”

Student is Arctic Council Delegate in Russia

A Week as an Arctic Council Delegate in Arkhangelsk, Russia (reprinted from ARCUS)

by Ali Giese, PhD Candidate, Earth Sciences

During the last week of February 2014, I had the privilege of representing the United States and Dartmouth College at the 2014 Model Arctic Council, a role-playing program with the same goals as the better-known Model UN: to expose students to high-level policy negotiations through experience and participation. The Model Arctic Council was held at the Northern Arctic Federal University (NArFU) in Arkhangelsk, Russia. Thirty graduate students from more than ten countries participated in simulated proceedings of the Arctic Council, a high-level intergovernmental forum for promoting cooperation, coordination, and interaction among the Arctic States, with the involvement of Arctic indigenous communities, on common Arctic issues.

Talking About Science (ARCUS)

Read the story in Dartmouth Now, October 28, 2013

Witness the Arctic, a publication of the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S., Oct 23, 2013

Lee McDavid, Arctic Program Manager, Dartmouth College, Dickey Center for International Understanding

A dozen teenagers from Greenland, Denmark, and the U.S. are twirling across the rolling tundra on the edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet laughing, looking as though they're just fooling around. But Dartmouth graduate students Julia Bradley-Cook and Ruth Heindel are leading them in a "carbon cycle dance" as a way to understand photosynthesis and other biological processes important to global warming.

Science in Greenland: It's a Girl Thing

The IGERT Polar Environmental Change PhD Program at the Institute of Arctic Studies sends a number of young women into the field to do polar science and engineering. In fact a majority of the 24 IGERT fellows are women. 

After a recent field season in Greenland, they wanted to show their enthusiasm for science and field work by creating a video. Read about some of the reasons they created it and watch it for yourself on YouTube.

 

Dartmouth Researchers Head South for the Winter -- to Antarctica

by Lee McDavid, Arctic Program Manager

A number of Dartmouth students, faculty and staff will be celebrating the holidays far from home, in fact, just about as far from home as you can get, unless you're a penguin.

Starting around Antarctica Day on December 1--which celebrates the signing of the international treaty in 1959 that preserves Antarctica as a place for research and peaceful purposes--and continuing well past Hanukkah, Christmas, New Years, and even Martin Luther King Day, Dartmouth researchers will be living and working "on the ice," the nickname for the most uninhabitable continent on earth. But the only continent with no permanent residents also has a lot of visitors, many of them researchers.

Going Global with Emily Unger '11

Dartmouth Now features a story about Emily Unger '11 who completed a whirlwind, worldwide trip to interview students on Dartmouth-sponsored international internships. She tells her story in the Nov/Dec issue of the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine. Her trip was sponsored by the Dickey Center. “We want to capture the unique ‘learning-while-doing’ experiences students have in the field,” explains Dickey Acting Director Christianne Wohlforth. “And we want to turn the telling of those stories into a professional development opportunity in itself.”

Student Interns at Clinic in East Timor

Lisbeth Labrada '13, on a Dickey Center International Internship, spent the summer working in a free health clinic in the small country of East Timor in Southeast Asia. She saw hundreds of patients a day for maternity and infant care, tuberculosis and malaria, and even HIV. She learned about the clinic by participating in another Dickey Center program for first year students, the Great Issues Scholars program.

Read Lisbeth's entire story written by Keith Chapman on Dartmouth Now.

 

IGERT Students Experience "Big Science"

by Lee McDavid, Program Manager, Institute of Arctic Studies

Photos by Courtney Hammond '11

Five Dartmouth graduate students in engineering, earth sciences, and ecology are bundled into puffy parkas and insulated pants standing on a layer of ice a mile thick marveling at a panoramic 360-degree blanket of white. "It makes me feel so small. It's humbling," says earth sciences graduate student Lee Corbett. Tonight it will be near zero and she'll be sleeping in a tent.

Welcome to the Greenland Ice Sheet, the first leg of the annual Dartmouth IGERT field seminar for graduate students in the polar environmental change program.

Reflections on Being a War and Peace Fellow

by Utkarsh Agarwal ’13, War and Peace Fellow

I was admitted into the War and Fellows Program in 2010 as a sophomore, and returned as a fellow for my junior and senior years. In my four years at Dartmouth, the W&P Fellows program has been one of the most insightful and exciting opportunities where I got to interact and learn from my peers just as much as I learnt from the guest speakers. As an engineering major at Dartmouth, the W&P Fellows Program allowed me to pursue my passion of international affairs without the burden of readings or homework.

Throughout the year, W&P Fellows get unfettered access to a long list of well-accomplished people including ex-ambassadors, war veterans, CIA analysts, activists and journalists who visit campus to give public talks. Fellows get the opportunity to speak to these guests in a candid, off-the-record, dinner setting. The W&P Fellows program is also self-driven in the sense that any Fellow can request to bring in a guest speaker to campus, and Dickey will fund their visit.

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