Internship

Students Intern at the CDC During the Ebola Response

by Ian Speers ’17, Allessandra LeDoux ’17, and Kristina Mani ’16

March 16, 2015

During our ten-week internship, we were welcomed into the dynamic and fast-paced environment of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) during the agency’s largest emergency response in history: the fight against Ebola in West Africa. While the number of Ebola cases has been declining globally, the amount of effort directed to controlling the disease has been astounding to watch.

For the Ebola response, DGMQ consolidated a group of experts and frontline responders to form the Global Migration Task Force (GMTF). This task force is responsible for all travel-related aspects of the Ebola response. Enhanced entry screening not only identifies travelers who may be sick with Ebola or may have had an exposure to Ebola when they arrive in the United States, but also ensures that these travelers are directed to appropriate care and monitoring, if needed, and equips travelers to help them monitor themselves for symptoms and report to their health department for active monitoring.

Dartmouth Explorers' Symposium Includes Board Member and Former Intern

The Ledyard Canoe Club is the lead sponsor of the “Dartmouth Explorers Symposium: Adventure, Learning, and Leadership on the World’s Rivers and Oceans,” from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. in 105 Dartmouth Hall, April 24, 2015. The event will feature Dartmouth (and Ledyard) alumni who have been part of historic journeys, from the first descent of Tibet’s Tsangpo River in 2002, to the 1964 National Geographic Danube and Sea of Japan expeditions.

The symposium was organized by Dan Reicher '78, a member of the Dickey Center Board of Visitors, and Esteban Castano '14, a former Louis J. Setti International Intern at the Dickey Center. Esteban also was instrumental is creating a series of videos for the Dickey Center about traveling abroad.

Read the entire article in Dartmouth Now

Working with VOICE 4 Girls in India

Eliana Piper ’14 and Rachel Funk '14

VOICE 4 Girls, Hyderabad, India

Eliana Piper ’14 and Rachel Funk ’14 both did internships with VOICE 4 Girls, a nonprofit based in Hyderabad, India, that equips girls to take charge of their futures by teaching marginalized girls general life skills, basic health and safety knowledge, and spoken English. The camps are fun and girl-focused and give campers tools to break cycles of social and economic inequality.

Eliana says the field work she did and the skills she learned will be extremely beneficial in her long term plans to do international gender development work. She found VOICE 4 Girls to be one of the most valuable experiences of her college career. She hopes to return to India to work again in some capacity. 

Looking Back: Dartmouth Seniors Reflect on Transformational Dickey Center Experiences

by Alexander A. Lopez '15

Photo: Evan Diamond ’13, Mahmud Johnson ’13, Lars Blackmore

As Dartmouth says goodbye to the Class of 2013, the Dickey Center asked seniors to reflect on the global learning that informed their passions, interests, and career paths. The following stories represent a sampling of the many amazing undergraduates that the Dickey Center has worked with over the past four years.

Evan Diamond '13:  Transforming Education and the Environment through Art 

Evan Diamond '13 knew he wanted to attend Dartmouth in the second grade. An avid ski-racer, growing up in Connecticut, Diamond described skiing at Dartmouth as “the dream.” Diamond’s dream became a reality when he was recruited to the Dartmouth ski team after rigorous preparations undergone at his private boarding school in Vermont.

Competitive skiing enabled Diamond to travel around the world, from Argentina to Chile, and throughout much of Europe. After two years, however, Diamond became injured and was unable to ski his junior season.

A Perfect Stepping Stone to International Economic Development

Todor Plamenov Parushev ’14
International Internship, Chile

Todor Plamenov Parushev ’14 completed an internship with the Natural Resources and Infrastructure Division of the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (UN-ECLAC) in Santiago, Chile. The UN-ECALC is a part of the UN Economic and Social Council that works in the areas of economic and social development, executing independent economic research, providing advisory services to governments, and other support activities towards public policy pre-shaping.

Todor’s internship focused on the field of infrastructural development, and specifically on how public policies on logistics and mobility are conceived, designed, implemented and controlled. The team that Todor worked with focused on resolving problems of transportation and logistics supply and demand by mathematical modeling, exploratory data analysis and predictive analytics of transportation data.

Improving Water Access in South Africa

by Georgi Klissurki '14, ThinkImpact, South Africa

My summer in South Africa working with ThinkImpact helping villagers find ways to improve water access has had and will continue to have an extremely strong impact on my life. Academically, I realized how well my two majors, engineering and economics, combine in real life, and particularly in entrepreneurship. In addition, I found great value in design thinking, an approach to innovation that integrates numerous disciplines and emphasizes empathy through utilizing the so-called human-centered design method.

I have serious post-graduation plans to work as an entrepreneur aiming to create positive social impact. Immediately after Dartmouth, I will continue gathering professional experience working in anti-trust economic consulting in New York City. After two or three years, I plan on attending graduate or professional school, if I feel that I can grow significantly there.

Following those years, I intend to return to my home country, Bulgaria, to start a career at the intersection of entrepreneurship and government.

Helping Orphans in Korea

Kathleen Herring ’14, Holt International Children's Services

Kathleen did a Dickey Center internship at Holt International Children’s Services in South Korea. Holt helps orphaned, abandoned, and vulnerable children to thrive by finding them loving families.

The Republic of Korea Special Adoption Act, which went into effect in August of 2012, reduced the number of international adoptions and prioritized domestic adoption. All inter-country adoptions now require the approval of Korean’s Family Court. As a result, it is now harder for Holt to find families for the orphans.

Kathleen was based in Ilsan Town Center, which housed 270 residents. She provided schooling and therapy for the residents, which included many children with a disability. 

Kathleen is not sure how long it will take for domestic adoption in Korea to increase or for international adoption to be accepted so that more children can be placed with families. She believes change will only occur when society prioritizes the needs of the children over cultural differences and disparities in intellectual and physical capacity.

Shooting a Film in Chile on Women in Prison

Jenna van de Ruit '15, International Internship, Chile

While on a Dickey International Internship during Winter term 2014, Jenna van de Ruit ’15 filmed a documentary in Chile in collaboration with Fundación Mujer Levántate, an organization that provides halfway housing, job networking, and other services to inmates and ex-inmates.

Jenna originally planned to focus her documentary on the stories of three or four women living there. However, most of the women were working long hours during the week and Jenna was only allowed there during limited hours.

But Jenna managed to interview Raquel, an ex-inmate who had been out for five months but who also was the janitor of Fundación Mujer Levántate. Raquel poured out her story to Jenna, who recognized it was a compelling story that could stand on its own.

“I had never undertaken a project this challenging before,” says Jenna. “I was new at a language, in a foreign country, learning a technical skill while working with a topic of a difficult nature.”

Student Learns About Poverty Working on Microfinance in the Dominican Republic

by Elliot Sandborn ‘14, International Internship, Dominican Republic

I lived in the barrios of East Santo Domingo and worked at a Banco ADEMI, the largest private, for-profit microfinance bank in the Dominican Republic, and one of the largest and most successful microfinance banks in Latin America. I lived with a local Dominican friend, Sam, whom I had met in the summer of 2009 as a high school volunteer in rural community in San Juan, DR.

At ADEMI, I worked alongside loan officers, visiting clients and following up on loans. I did research on ADEMI's history, their model of microfinance, and tried to tap into what was it that made them so successful. Drawing on my experiences in the field with the loan officers, executive interviews and a 1997 World Bank case study on ADEMI, I compiled a 13,000-word report for the president of the bank that reflected on what I - and my informants - considered to be key aspects of the ADEMI model, including the continuity of leadership and vision the bank has experienced and the strong commitment to a "business-like approach" to service.

Working with Grassroots Community Clinic in Rural Peru

by Sam Steeter '13, TH '14, International Internship, Peru, Sacred Valley Health

In addition to my academic interests in engineering, I have a long-term interest in global health and medicine in rural and under-resourced locations. In the spring of 2012, I undertook a Dickey Center internship in a small mountain community called Ollantaytambo, in the Sacred Valley of the Inca, Peru, with a newly formed, non-governmental, non-profit organization called Sacred Valley Health.

SVH provided mobile medical clinics in a number of communities throughout the Sacred Valley free of charge and was in the early stages of implementing a collaborative, grassroots community health workers education program in isolated Quechua villages throughout the Sacred Valley. My work involved organizing and processing remote community baseline health data from mobile clinics, which was eventually used in the training, monitoring and evaluation of the SVH community health workers education program.

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