In the News

IGERT Fellows Use Improv to Communicate Research (Nature)

January 7, 2014

Two Dickey Center IGERT Fellows are featured in an article in Nature about science communication and Dartmouth's partnership with Stony Brook University’s Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science. The center will work with Dartmouth faculty, undergraduates, and graduate students on improving their skills in communicating their research, in part through the use of improvisation.

A handful of IGERT fellows took part in the training. Two graduate students in ecology and evolutionary biology, Jessica Trout-Haney and Christine Urbanowitz, describe how the training helped them. "Telling a personal story has made giving talks much more authentic, and fun,” said Trout-Haney. After her initial trepidation about taking part in improvisation, Urbanowitz says it improved her confidence. “Improv allows you to trust yourself enough to know that you'll be able to figure out where you're going with your presentation without having it memorized."

Dickey Senior Receives Prestigious Rhodes Scholarship

December 4, 2013

Joseph Singh ’14, of Toronto, Ontario, has been named a 2014 Rhodes Scholar, the oldest and most prestigious postgraduate academic award for international study. The Rhodes Scholarship pays all expenses for a graduate program at the University of Oxfordin England.

Singh has been deeply involved with Dickey Center programs since his first term on campus, when he was selected to participate in the year-long Great Issues Scholars program. Last summer he won a Dickey Center Class of '66 International Internship to work at the Institute for Near East Gulf Military Analysis, in Washington, DC.

"This is great news for Joe and richly deserved," says Daniel Benjamin, Director of the Dickey Center. "We were all impressed when, as one of the Dickey Center's Class of '66 Interns, he co-wrote a piece for the Foreign Policy website on the relationshp between Russia and Syria. He's sharp, insightful and motivated."

Ehud Olmert Discusses Peace and the Arab Spring

View Prime Minister Ehud Olmert's presentation on November 12, 2013, online.

Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, who many say came as close as any politician to a peace agreement with the Palestinians, welcomed the opportunity to outline his thoughts on the prospects for peace amid the Arab Spring in a November 12 address at Dartmouth, “where so many heads of state and world leaders have visited before me.”

Daniel Benjamin, Director of the Dickey Center for International Understanding, noted that Olmert is an important figure in Israeli and Mideast politics because of his political evolution from the political right “to become a leader of the peace process who came tantalizingly close to forging a peace with the Palestinians.”

Olmert spoke with a group of Dartmouth students at lunch and later addressed approximately 500 faculty, staff, students, and community members in Cook Auditorium at the Tuck School of Business.

Talking About Science (ARCUS)

Read the story in Dartmouth Now, October 28, 2013

Witness the Arctic, a publication of the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S., Oct 23, 2013

Lee McDavid, Arctic Program Manager, Dartmouth College, Dickey Center for International Understanding

A dozen teenagers from Greenland, Denmark, and the U.S. are twirling across the rolling tundra on the edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet laughing, looking as though they're just fooling around. But Dartmouth graduate students Julia Bradley-Cook and Ruth Heindel are leading them in a "carbon cycle dance" as a way to understand photosynthesis and other biological processes important to global warming.

Ex ‘Post’ Editor Hails Hanlon’s Commitment to Liberal Arts

October 23, 2013 by

Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Steve Coll, dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University and former Washington Post managing editor, welcomes the emphasis President Phil Hanlon ’77 places on the liberal arts as the foundation for success. Coll says that the ability to think across disciplines is vitally important in the quickly evolving world of journalism and new media.

Steve Coll won a Pulitzer for his book “Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001.”

It was an undergraduate grounding in English and history that launched his own career, Coll says in a video interview during his recent visit to Dartmouth. “A lot of journalism is about thinking and writing,” he says. “Even in the multimedia age, that’s still true.”

Siege at Nairobi Mall Ends (WSJ)

Dartmouth Now 9/26/13

Daniel Benjamin, Director of the Dickey Center, and the U.S. State Department’s former top counterterrorism official, tells the Wall Street Journal that Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta’s inexperience may have prolonged the crisis.

“Part of the reason the attack was so devastating is the Kenyans’ lack of experience with a situation like this,” Benjamin tells the Journal.

Read the full story, published 9/24/13 by The Wall Street Journal.

 

Fuel for Thought: Travels in Tanzania (Scientific American)

Posted August 6, 2013, Dartmouth Now.

In a blog entry for Scientific American, Tucker Oddleifson ’16, James Kennedy ’14, Rachel Margolese ’16, and Jingxi Li ’14—members of the Thayer School of Engineering student-led group Dartmouth Humanitarian Engineering—write about working in Tanzania this summer to promote sustainable and cost-effective cooking fuel.

“After a year of working with briquettes, pyrolysis, and all things fuel back on campus, we are putting our knowledge to work in Arusha, Tanzania,” write the students. “We hope to build the capacity of local Tanzanians to produce their own cooking fuel. Specifically, we are working on small-scale charcoal production and briquetting—creating small fuel bricks out of waste biomass carbonized into charcoal—through our work with several NGOs and local communities.”

Intercepted Threat and Embassy Closings (Chicago Tribune)

Dartmouth Now (August 6, 2013)

In a Reuters story published by the Chicago Tribune, the reporter turns to Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin for a comment about the intercepted communication between al Qaeda leaders that led, in part, to the closing of many U.S. embassies in the Middle East and Africa.

Read the entire story in the Chicago Tribune.

 

Cross This Line and I'm Gonna Do Nothing (Boston Globe)

The research of Dickey Center's War and Peace Program Director Daryl Press, an associate professor government, is highlighted in a Boston Globe article on the effect ultimatums have on a nation's or leader's credibility.

Link to the Dartmouth Now and Boston Globe stories.

 

Credit Where Credit's Due (New Republic)

In an opinion piece published May 29, 2013, in The New Republic, Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin responds to criticism of President Obama's recent speech at the National Defense University and assesses gains made in fighting terrorism.

In "Credit Where It's Due: If Anything, Obama Understates Our Progress Against Terrorism," Benjamin comments on the "overheated" sentiments of some Republicans towards President Obama's assertion that almost twelve years since 9/11, it is time to change tactics. Although the threat remains, Benjamin agrees with Obama's argument that it's time to "move beyond the tools of warfare to deal with terrorism."

"Obamaʼs assessment is very much on target and comports with what I and many of my colleagues have been saying," he writes.

The full text of the article is published online at the New Republic.

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