In the News

A Euro-Atlantic Action Plan for Cooperation and Enhanced Arctic Security

Report Calls for Action in Advance of Arctic Council's May 15, 2013 Meeting

A Euro-Atlantic Action Plan for Cooperation and Enhanced Arctic Security (pdf)

Media contact: John Cramer | [email protected] | 603-646-9130

HANOVER, N.H. – May 13, 2013 – Arctic Council nations, which border the planet’s rapidly changing northern region, should urgently adopt shipping rules, improve safeguards against oil spills and create environmental and safety standards in polar waters, according to a report released today by the University of the Arctic's Institute for Applied Circumpolar Policy (IACP).

IGERTs Win and Place for NSF Fellowship

Seventeen Dartmouth students and alumni have received prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships (GRF) for 2014. Recipients include IGERT Fellow Alden Adolph, who will continue her research at Thayer School of Engineering studying the physical properties of snow and firn. Honorable mentions included IGERT Ruth Heindel, an earth sciences PhD student working with Ross Virginia on geosciences and paleoclimate.

Adolph is among 2,000 winners drawn from an applicant pool of more than 14,000. An additional 19 Dartmouth applicants were accorded honorable mention in the competition.

Read the entire Dartmouth Now story by Joseph Blumberg.

Dartmouth Students Get a Taste of Foreign Relations Through Crisis Simulation

Around 50 Dickey Center Great Issues Scholarsand War and Peace Fellowsgathered in January at Lake Morey Resort in Fairlee, Vt., to participate in a crisis simulation involving the collapse of the North Korean government. Fred Hill, who previously helped craft war games for the State Department, directed the simulation. Students were assigned to teams to represent countries, as they negotiated behind closed doors, participated in United Nations meetings, and tried to reach a joint resolution.

Read the full story in Dartmouth Now by Keith Chapman on how the groups used international relations to under complex issues.

 

Science in Greenland: It's a Girl Thing

The IGERT Polar Environmental Change PhD Program at the Institute of Arctic Studies sends a number of young women into the field to do polar science and engineering. In fact a majority of the 24 IGERT fellows are women. 

After a recent field season in Greenland, they wanted to show their enthusiasm for science and field work by creating a video. Read about some of the reasons they created it and watch it for yourself on YouTube.

 

Award-winning Manuscript Part of Dickey Faculty Program

Associate Professor of art history Mary Coffey has won the 2013 Charles Rufus Morey Award for her first book, How a Revolutionary Art Became Official Culture: Murals, Museums, and the Mexican State.The award is given by the College Art Association to a distinguished book of art history. Coffey participated in the manuscript review program of the Dickey Center prior to publication.

Read the entire story in Dartmouth Now by Keith Chapman.

 

Dartmouth IGERT Tackles Pressing Environmental Issues

IGERT students and faculty members are seen on their research trip near the west coast of Greenland. (Photo by Alexandra Giese)

With the last group of fellows arriving on campus this fall, one might think things are winding down for Dartmouth’s IGERT program. But in reality, research and collaboration are starting to truly cook now that all of the fellows are on campus.

“We’re really starting to move rapidly,” says Ross Virginia, the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science and the director of Dartmouth’s Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship program. As IGERTconnects research to real world problems, Virginia says, “we’re trying to communicate science in insightful and meaningful ways.”

Read the rest of Keith Chapman's storyabout the IGERT program on Dartmouth Now.

 

The Ethics of Taking on the World's Problems

Victoria Trump Redd '14

Former Dickey Center Intern Victoria Trump Redd ’14 is featured in the Dartmouth College Fund’s Fall 2012 issue of GREEN at Dartmouthand on the Dartmouth Nowwebsite. Victoria talks about her transformative experience working in a small, local health care center in Peru.

An anthropology major and international studies minorwho plans to go to medical school, Victoria was a Dickey Center Great Issues Scholarduring her first year and subsequently a Dickey Intern. Her first-person story in GREENis a testiment to John Sloan Dickey: “The world’s troubles are your troubles."

 

Dartmouth Researchers Head South for the Winter -- to Antarctica

by Lee McDavid, Arctic Program Manager

A number of Dartmouth students, faculty and staff will be celebrating the holidays far from home, in fact, just about as far from home as you can get, unless you're a penguin.

Starting around Antarctica Day on December 1--which celebrates the signing of the international treaty in 1959 that preserves Antarctica as a place for research and peaceful purposes--and continuing well past Hanukkah, Christmas, New Years, and even Martin Luther King Day, Dartmouth researchers will be living and working "on the ice," the nickname for the most uninhabitable continent on earth. But the only continent with no permanent residents also has a lot of visitors, many of them researchers.

Going Global with Emily Unger '11

Dartmouth Now features a story about Emily Unger '11 who completed a whirlwind, worldwide trip to interview students on Dartmouth-sponsored international internships. She tells her story in the Nov/Dec issue of the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine. Her trip was sponsored by the Dickey Center. “We want to capture the unique ‘learning-while-doing’ experiences students have in the field,” explains Dickey Acting Director Christianne Wohlforth. “And we want to turn the telling of those stories into a professional development opportunity in itself.”

Northern Forests Threatened by Southern Pine Beetle

The thought of global climate change conjures up images of coastal flooding and parched farmlands, but there is another sort of threat already upon us. As the environment warms, the destructive southern pine beetle has extended its range northward to include New Jersey’s prized Pinelands National Reserve.

Dartmouth Professor of Biology Matt Ayres, is an expert on the predatory pine beetle, and his work over the years has added to our understanding of its destructive spread into northern forests.

Read the entire story by Joseph Blumberg at Dartmouth Now.

 

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