In the News

Rhodes Scholar is Lombard Public Service Fellow

Miriam Jerotich Kilimo ’14 of Nairobi, Kenya, has been named a Rhodes Scholar for 2015—the 76th Rhodes Scholar in Dartmouth’s history. Miriam was awarded a Lombard Public Service Fellowship this year by the Dickey Center and the Tucker Foundation for work with the Africa Coordinating Center for the Abandonment of Female Genital Mutilation (ACCAF). She is currently based at the University of Nairobi in Kenya. She is supporting the organization's efforts to sensitive different communities about the health and socio-economic effects associated with the practice. She is also involved in creating and equipping a resource center focused on compiling research and literature on female circumcision as it is practiced continent-wide.

Dartmouth a Lead on Fulbright Arctic Program

October 22, 2014  Dartmouth Now

Professor Ross Virginia, Director of the Dickey Center's Institute of Arctic Studies, was selected by the U.S. State Department as one of two distinguished scholar leaders of the newly established Fulbright Arctic Initiative. His work focuses on climate change and the effect of rapid warming on the polar regions.

Virginia, the Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science, and Professor Michael Sfraga, a geographer and vice chancellor for university and student advancement from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, will take lead roles in the new Fulbright Arctic research program, which will fund interdisciplinary work for some 16 scholars from the eight countries that sit on the Arctic Council, an intergovernmental forum of the eight member states that border the Arctic Circle.

Fear Factor, Insect Growth and Climate Change

September 23, 2014 

Research published by Lauren Culler, a Postdoctoral Arctic Fellow at the Dickey Center's Institute of Arctic Studies, shows fear as well as warming temperatures may encourage insects to "eat more and grow faster." 

Culler tells Entomology Today, "In other words, it's less about temperature and more about the overall environmental conditions that shape the growth, survival, and distribution of insects." Culler was lead author of the study, published in the journal Oecologia

Read about her research at Entomology TodayNature World News, and Science Daily.

Dickey Center Faculty Grants Seed International Research Excellence

April 17, 2018

From pilot studies of clay-captured fingerprints to seed grants for a book about Nepalese culture and social change, the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding helps support between 20-25 faculty each year in their pursuit of early career and innovative research around the world.

Why climate change is worsening public health problems

January 25, 2018  |  The Conversation

The Dickey Center's Global Health Initiative Program Manager Anne Sosin and Dartmouth Assistant Professor of Anthropology Chelsey Kivland published an article in "The Conversation" online about the effects of climate change on public health worldwide. 

“We believe that leaders must recognize that environmental policy is health policy. Rollbacks of environmental regulations will cause far greater consequences on health, in the U.S. and globally, than any health care bill.”

They describe the burden of climate change on communities in Haiti and Puerto Rico in particular. 

Mentoring the Next Generation of Polar Scientists

December 1, 2017  |  Witness the Arctic

An article about the mentoring work of JSEP (Joint Science Education Program) written by Lauren Culler, Outreach Coordinator for the Institute of Arctic Studies, and Lee McDavid, Program Manager of the Institute of Arctic Studies, appeared in Witness the Arctic, an online publication of ARCUS (the Arctic Research Consortium of the US). 

JSEP is funded by the National Science Foundation, along with a companion program, JASE (Joint Antarctic Science Expedition). JSEP faculty take five US high school students to Greenland for a polar science education program with students and faculty from Greenland and Denmark. JASE takes four Spanish-speaking US high school students to Chile, where they join up with a group of Chilean students for an learning expedition to Antarctica. 

Leading Social & Natural Science Organizations Merge

October 26, 2017 

Members of the world’s leading international science bodies, the International Council for Science (ICSU) and the International Social Science Council (ISSC), agreed in a historic vote to merge and create a unified international organization, the International Science Council. Melody Brown Burkins, Associate Director for Programs and Research at the Dickey Center for International Understanding, was part of the four-person U.S. delegation, which included two other members of the U.S. National Academies’ Board on International Scientific Organization (BISO) and the National Academies' Foreign Secretary. Burkins, who is also an Adjunct Professor of Environmental Studies and teaches a course on “The Practice of Science Policy and Diplomacy," was the only woman in the U.S. delegation.

Why the Vegas Shooter Did It

October 13, 2017  |  POLITICO MAGAZINE

Dickey Center Director Daniel Benjamin writes in Politico Magazine on the speculation around why Stephen Paddock killed 58 people and wounded almost 500 in the worst mass killing in US history. What was his motive? Possibly simply fame, in an age when the Internet makes instant fame possible.

Paddock thus becomes the latest embodiment of a pattern that has emerged in recent decades. In a world gushing with information about fresh atrocities on the internet and social media, one where screaming chyrons and shouting talk radio hosts have become ubiquitous, a small number of individuals seek to make their mark through record-setting violence. By doing so, they hope to distinguish lives hitherto marked by insignificance or failure.

Read his article online

 

1917 Centennial Series

Also see the Dartmouth News article on the 1917 Series.

DOWNLOAD LIST OF EVENTS (pdf)

“The past is never dead. It's not even past,” William Faulkner famously wrote in his novel Requiem for a Nun.  Here at the Dickey Center, we tend to focus on the present and the foremost issues of the day.  Sometimes, though, it is necessary to head upstream and reconsider the historical events that brought us to where we are. 

This year’s fall term is one of those times, and we are devoting a good deal of energy to an unusual series of events marking the centennial of 1917, a year with a good claim to be the pivotal one in the transition from the relative peacefulness of the 19th century to the tumultuous, all-too-tragic 20th century. The year was filled with political drama and bloodshed, but two events stand out: the October Revolution in Russia and the entry of the United States into World War I.

Undergraduate Saves Lives With Her Nonprofit, SOAP

September 27, 2017  |  Dartmouth News

by Charlotte Albright

Hand washing saves lives. That’s why Sydney Kamen ’19 founded a nonprofit organization that recycles used soap from hotels and distributes it to under-resourced communities around the world.

Her advocacy work has won accolades, including the 2017 Tikkun Olam (Repairing the World) Award from the Helen Diller Family Foundation, the Prudential Spirit of Community Award, the Daily Point of Light Award, and the Robert Sheppard Leadership Award. Her work has also come to the attention of People magazine, in an article and video interview.

Kamen says she’s grateful for the public attention, but wants the spotlight to be on the problem she is trying to solve. “Over 1.8 million children die every year from diarrhea,” she says. “But mortality from infectious diseases can be cut in half through handwashing and by improving basic hygiene.”

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