In the News

Wilson Center Features Ross Virginia in Polar Interactive

August 28, 2017

The Wilson Center in Washington, DC, has created a beautiful and important online interactive called "Into the Arctic" that considers issues facing the Arctic today. Ross Virginia is featured in the section "The Arctic Environment in the Age of Man," along with Senior Arctic Fellow Lenore Grenoble, who narrates "Interactive: Languages of the Arctic."

 

Wilson Center Names Ross Virginia Polar Initiative Fellow

July 6, 2017  |  Dartmouth News  |  Bill Platt

Three Decades of Climate Research in Antarctica

August 26, 2017  |  Valley News

by Matt Hongoltz-Hetling

After the crew members tied the helicopter down to prevent it from blowing away in what was shaping up to be one of Antarctica’s famously powerful storms, they crawled over the frozen ground to join Dartmouth Professor Ross Virginia and a handful of students in the crowded emergency shelter.

They’d seen the storm on the horizon, a solid wall of clouds rushing toward them, and soon they felt it too — winds that slammed into the small aircraft and caused it to bounce erratically. Though they were just minutes from the relative safety of McMurdo Station on Ross Island, they had to abandon their plans and seek immediate shelter on the ground.

“It was a plywood shack with a little stove in it,” Virginia recalled. “There was a radio, and bunk beds. A little table. Nine of us jammed in there.”

Read the entire article at the Valley News

Mosquitoes Getting Bigger and Badder

August 14, 2017

In a National Geographic article Lauren Culler discusses the challenge of dealing with a greater number of mosquitoes emerging in Greenland. 

 "There aren’t a lot of animals for them to eat in the Arctic, so when they finally find one, they are ferocious. They are relentless. They do not stop. They just keep going after you."

A threat to caribou as well as people, mosquitoes are emerging earlier, getting bigger and hang around longer, driven by warmer temperatures. Cullers new research has been published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Dickey Center Fellow Receives Prestigious Research Award from the Government of Canada

We are extremely pleased to announce that Leah Sarson, postdoctoral research associate in the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth and Visiting Arctic Fellow in the Institute of Arctic Studies, was recently chosen to receive a prestigious Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) fellowship from the Government of Canada, an award given to the “most promising Canadian new scholars in the social sciences and humanities.”

Sarson will use her award to continue her postdoctoral work at Dartmouth with Melody Brown Burkins, Adjunct Professor of Environmental Studies and Associate Director for Programs and Research at the Dickey Center, Ross Virginia, Myers Family Professor of Environmental Science and Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies, and several other Dartmouth colleagues.

Virginia Comments on Greenland Toxins in Popular Science Article

July 12, 2017  |  Popular Science

As the huge ice sheet melts, it releases toxins—and microbes that eat them, reports Poular Science magazine. They turned for comment to Professor Ross Virginia, Director of the Institute of Arctic Studies: “It’s potentially good news that degraders are found in the melting ice ecosystem." 

Read the entire article in Popular Science, July 11, 2017.

Fulbright Arctic Initiative Accepting Applications

July 12, 2017  |  Fulbright Scholar Program release

Fulbright Arctic Initiative information (pdf)

18-month research program will expand collaborative networks and address shared priorities

The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs has announced the launch of the second Fulbright Arctic Initiative.

The Fulbright Arctic Initiative is designed to create a network to stimulate international research collaboration on Arctic issues while increasing mutual understanding between people of the United States and the people of other countries.  Using a collaborative multidisciplinary model to emphasize communication across disciplines and knowledge co-production, the Initiative will translate theory into practice to address public-policy research questions relevant to Arctic Council member states’ shared challenges and opportunities.

Former Dickey Center Foreign Policy Fellow Wins APSA Award for First Book

June 14, 2017

Rosella Cappella Zielinski, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Boston University, and a 2012-13 Dickey Center U.S. Foreign Policy and International Security Post-doctoral Fellow, has won the American Political Science Association (APSA) Robert L. Jervis and Paul W. Schroeder Best Book Award in International History and Politics. How States Pay for War, published in 2016 by Cornell University Press, is Cappella Zielinski's first book. It was also the subject of her dissertation, which she completed while in residence at Dartmouth.    

"My time at Dartmouth gave me the space to do the edits necessary to get the manuscript for review," says Capella Zielinski. "More importantly, it gave me the time and helpful feedback to get the book prospectus in good shape."

More information:

U.S. Foreign Policy and International Security Post-doctoral Fellowship

War & Peace Fellow Publishes in Prestigious Military Journal

June 15, 2017

Charlotte Blatt '18, a Dickey Center War & Peace Fellow and government major, has published an article in Parameter, one of the U.S. military's top professional journals. "Operational Success, Strategic Failure: Assessing the 2007 Iraq Troop Surge," Blatt's sophomore seminar paper, is published in the Spring 2017 issue. 

Her paper also won the 2017 Edwin H. Sherman Family Prize, awarded by Temple University to the top undergraduate paper written on diplomacy and the use of force. According to Jeffrey Friedman, Assistant Professor of Government at Dartmouth, receiving these awards is a major accomplishment for an undergraduate. 

More information: 

Dartmouth News

Is Trump Fighting Terrorism?

June 4, 2017  |  POLITICO

by Daniel Benjamin

Is Trump Fighting Terrorism?  Or is he just tweeting about it, while making it worse?

Donald Trump came to the presidency on a wave of overheated rhetoric about the terrorist threat, the failures of his predecessors, and promises, as he said in his inaugural address, to “unite the civilized world against radical Islamic terrorism, which we will eradicate completely from the face of the Earth.” Four months into his term, and on the heels of Saturday’s terrorist attack in London, which killed seven and injured dozens in the third attack in Britain in three months, it’s worth asking: Is Trump actually delivering decisive counterterrorism?

Leah Sarson, Dickey Center Fellow, on CTV News

May 25, 2017

Dickey Center Post-doctoral Researcher Leah Sarson talked to CTV News in Canada about President Trump's first meeting with NATO leaders in Brussels today. In response to a question about President Trump's call for greater defense spending among allies, she said, "I certainly think that Donald Trump has proven to be a wild card today. I think he suprised a lot of people by not mentioning Article 5, at the heart of NATO, promising collective defence. He has hammered home his agenda, pushing defense spending and burden sharing among NATO allies."

She went on to note that the 2% of GDP contribution required of NATO nations is not due until 2024. 

Listen to Dr. Sarson's entire interview (start at 1:30) at CTV News online

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