Student Story

Building Access to Clean Drinking Water

During the summer of 2017, David Ouma '20 interned with Jibu Company in Uganda, Rwanda, and Kenya. Jibu is a company that builds a network of locally owned franchises that enhance access to clean drinking water within communities. David worked with the corporate and engineering/tech teams.

by David Ouma ’20, Class of 1966 Named Intern

I spent the first part of my internship in Kampala, Uganda, where Jibu Company is quite established and has a big market presence. While there I was trained by the in-country Jibu engineer on the ultra-filtration equipment used by the franchises. During the training, I spent a considerable amount of time studying the water purification process, the chemicals used and how to assemble a model of the machine they were using.

While in Kampala, the company housed me and I lived with another employee, an American who would become a friend and a guide as I traversed the city. The company was using a franchise business model—all the equipment was owned by the corporate company—so they had to run maintenance.

Undergraduate Saves Lives With Her Nonprofit, SOAP

September 27, 2017  |  Dartmouth News

by Charlotte Albright

Hand washing saves lives. That’s why Sydney Kamen ’19 founded a nonprofit organization that recycles used soap from hotels and distributes it to under-resourced communities around the world.

Her advocacy work has won accolades, including the 2017 Tikkun Olam (Repairing the World) Award from the Helen Diller Family Foundation, the Prudential Spirit of Community Award, the Daily Point of Light Award, and the Robert Sheppard Leadership Award. Her work has also come to the attention of People magazine, in an article and video interview.

Kamen says she’s grateful for the public attention, but wants the spotlight to be on the problem she is trying to solve. “Over 1.8 million children die every year from diarrhea,” she says. “But mortality from infectious diseases can be cut in half through handwashing and by improving basic hygiene.”

Believing in the Power of People

by Milan Chuttani ’18

During the fall of 2016, Milan Chuttani '18 interned with the International Rescue Committee in Baltimore, Maryland. Names have been modified to preserve the anonymity of IRC clients.

I have always been passionate in making people feel welcome in communities I care about. As a student of international relations, I am also fascinated by the consequences of wars, politics, and rivalries between world powers. Interning with the Asylee Case Management team at the International Rescue Committee resettlement office in Baltimore provided me the unique ability to combine both of these interests, to work with people fleeing war and persecution from around the world, and to welcome them into their new American communities.

Poisonous Snakes and Earthquakes: Conservation in Costa Rica

by Victoria Chi '17

During the spring of 2017, Alexander Cotnoir ’19 interned in Costa Rica at Osa Conservation, an organization that works to protect the biodiversity of Osa Peninsula.

When students engage in internships abroad, they often have to adapt to new and unexpected work environments. Few students, however, have to brave thunderstorms and earthquakes, poisonous snakes and insects, and toxic plants. Environmental Studies major Alexander Cotnoir ’19 confronted all of these obstacles, fearlessly and even with excitement, during his internship in the spring of 2017.

War & Peace Fellow Publishes in Prestigious Military Journal

June 15, 2017

Charlotte Blatt '18, a Dickey Center War & Peace Fellow and government major, has published an article in Parameter, one of the U.S. military's top professional journals. "Operational Success, Strategic Failure: Assessing the 2007 Iraq Troop Surge," Blatt's sophomore seminar paper, is published in the Spring 2017 issue. 

Her paper also won the 2017 Edwin H. Sherman Family Prize, awarded by Temple University to the top undergraduate paper written on diplomacy and the use of force. According to Jeffrey Friedman, Assistant Professor of Government at Dartmouth, receiving these awards is a major accomplishment for an undergraduate. 

More information: 

Dartmouth News

Emergency Preparedness in Peru

During the summer of 2016, Jade McLaughlin ’17 and Madellena Thornton ’17 worked as Global Health Initiative interns at Hospital Cayetano Heredia (HCH) in Lima, Peru. Their work on emergency preparedness focused on the willingness of healthcare workers to respond in a disaster.

by Madellena Thornton ‘17

The eight districts in Northern Lima stricken by poverty are incredibly vulnerable to devastation from a natural or biological disaster due to the lack of first-response services, potentially collapsible and densely clustered housing, and enormous education and income disparities. Hospital Cayetano Heredia (HCH), a general level III-1 hospital, constitutes one of three hospitals in the Ministry of Health in Northern Lima. Among the three hospitals, there are fewer than 900 beds. With a population of 2.75 million people, these hospitals together have insufficient capacity for healthcare, overwhelmed emergency services, and large gaps in disaster risk management for the population that they serve.

The CDC and an Interconnected World

Victoria Chi ‘17

When we think about the mission of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)—to protect the health of Americans—we often think about addressing domestic health issues, or about coordinating emergency responses to global disease epidemics. Both of these are so vitally important. Yet in this increasingly interconnected world, equally important is the need to improve the health and well-being of people in countries across the globe, and to steadily build the public health capacity of all nations to respond to disease threats.

Over winter term 2016, I worked as an intern in the policy office of the Center for Global Health within the CDC. Throughout this internship, I watched and learned from the people who are working every day to ensure that all people have access to the most fundamental of human rights: the right to good health. I was exposed to the myriad programs and initiatives that exist to improve the health of populations and to strengthen health care systems, and I recognized that bolstering the health and capacity of countries abroad makes the entire world safer from the spread of disease.

Students Attend Matariki Global Citizenship Meeting

A group of 27 faculty and students from six partner institutions in the Matariki Network of Universities (MNU) came together for a multi-institutional, faculty-student workshop in Uppsala, Sweden, April 18-21, 2016. It was the first meeting of the Global Citizenship Programme. The Dartmouth delegation included Dickey Center Associate Director for Programs and Research and Adjunct Professor, Melody Brown Burkins (PhD ’98), Victor Cabrera ’19, and Freya Jamison ’17 as well as Assistant Provost Laurel Stavis and Research Professor Ron Edsforth.

The event focused on developing the future of the new Global Citizenship Programme, which aims to set up substantial links and projects around global citizenship between and within partner universities. The programme can cover both education and research, along with outreach activities, but it initially is focused on the following strands:

Polar Passion

February 2016

The Dartmouth Engineering Magazine this month has a story about Thayer PhD graduate student Alden Adolph, who accompanied fifteen high school students to Greenland last summer with the Joint Science Education Project (JSEP), funded by the National Science Foundation. JSEP is run jointly by the Institute of Arctic Studies at the Dickey Center for International Understanding and the Government of Greenland. The students are from the US, Greenland and Denmark.

Adolph was accompanied by Thayer PhD candidate Amber Whelsky and Lauren Culler, Co-PI of JSEP and a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute of Arctic Studies. Adolph and Culler were students in the Polar Environmental Change IGERT. 

Oh, Canada!

October 22, 2015

Leehi Yona '16, a Senior Fellow Stamps Scholar, and Presidential Fellow with Professor Ross Virginia in environmental studies, has published an editorial in the Montreal Gazette on expectations for newly-elected Justin Trudeau. Her editorial, "On climate change, Justin Trudeau's positive rhetoric won't be enough," calls on Trudeau to go beyond his "In Canada, better is always possible" rhetoric. She writes, "The positive rhetoric is welcome, but it is not enough. Canadians expect him to work hard toward positive climate action for the future of young generations."

Read her entire op-ed.

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